Yale Law Journal’s first issue of Vol. 123 explores racial disparity in sentencing, gun control, unions, and special juries

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (Volume 123, No. 1, Oct. 2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:

• Article, “Mandatory Sentencing and Racial Disparity: Assessing the Role of Prosecutors and the Effects of Booker,” by Sonja B. Starr & M. Marit Rehavi
• Article, “Firearm [...]

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review’s issue 3 of 2013 explores tortfest, constitutionality, nudges and floodgates

The University of Chicago Law Review’s third issue, 2013, features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal scholars, as well as extensive student research in the form of Comments. Contents are:
ARTICLES
• Tortfest, by J. Shahar Dillbary
• Judging the Flood of Litigation, by Marin K. Levy
• Unbundling Constitutionality, by Richard Primus
• When Nudges Fail: Slippery Defaults, [...]

Full Story »

Jesse Choper’s powerful Judicial Review and the National Political Process available as an eBook

As constitutional scholar John Nowak noted when this classic book was first published, “Professor Choper’s Judicial Review and the National Political Process is mandatory reading for anyone seriously attempting to study our constitutional system of government. It is an important assessment of the democratic process and the theoretical and practical role of the Supreme Court.”
That [...]

Full Story »

Revolutionary, classic book Cybernetics: now in quality eBook, hardcover, and paperback editions

CYBERNETICS is on virtually everyone’s short list of the most important and influential nonfiction books of the last century. First published by MIT math professor Norbert Wiener in 1948, and later expanded in its Second Edition in 1961, this groundbreaking account of systems, thought processes, AI, and the use of “feedback” [...]

Full Story »

Stuart Scheingold’s Pathbreaking Study of European Integration by Law is a Digitally Remastered Book

In the early days of what would become the European Union, the new entity had a weak and ill-defined legislature and executive. And the European Court of Justice, whose decisions, actions, and even inactions subtly paved the way to a continent’s integration. “Scheingold showed that its efforts, deftly melding law and politics, were a success beyond mere dispute-resolution and development of legal doctrine,” states the new introduction to this classic study. “He was well aware that he was present at the creation of a powerful new institution. Yet he stood virtually alone in seeing what such an institution, using its power this way, could realize in terms of political integration. The resulting book was a masterpiece.”

Full Story »

Harry Scheiber’s classic study of Wilson and civil liberties is back in print … and in eBooks

The Wilson Administration and Civil Liberties, 1917-1921, is a Digitally Remastered™ reprint of one of the classic works of legal and social history. Harry Scheiber’s much-cited study of Woodrow Wilson and his cabinet explores the suppression of speech and print publication during an era of world war, the Red Scare, anti-foreign fervor, and unionism.
Wilson’s notable [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review’s June 2013 Issue Covers Racial Capitalism, Shallow Signals, Heirs, and Civil Rights Lawyers

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents and URLs, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 8 include:
• Article, “Racial Capitalism,” by Nancy Leong
• Essay, “Shallow Signals,” by Bert I. Huang
• Book Review, “All Unhappy Families: Tales of Old Age, Rational Actors, and the Disordered Life,” by [...]

Full Story »

Alison Renteln’s Classic Study of the Relativity of Human Rights Norms; Adds New Foreword by Tom Zwart

A classic socio-legal study of the incompatibility and possible reconciliation of competing views of culture relativism and absolute fundamental human rights. It features prodigious research and insight that has often been cited by academics and human rights lawyers and activists over two decades. Originally published by Sage, the book is now available in Quid Pro’s Classics of the Social Sciences Series, in new eBook and paperback editions; it remains one of the foundational works in human rights.

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review’s May 2013 Symposium on Privacy & Tech; Issue Adds Articles on Administrative Review and the OIRA

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, active URLs in notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 7 include scholarly articles and student case notes, as well as an extensive Symposium on Privacy and Technology. Subjects include:
Article, “Agency Self-Insulation Under [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review’s April 2013 Issue features Developments on Immigration, Coase Theorem, and “Unwritten” Constitution

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 6 include scholarly articles and student case notes, as well as as the extensive, annual survey of emerging Developments in the Law. This year’s subject is immigration law [...]

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review’s Symposium on Immigration Features Leading Scholars in the Field

This first issue of 2013 features articles from internationally recognized scholars on immigration and emigration, including an extensive Symposium on immigration and its issues of policy, law, administrative process, and institutional design in the United States.
Topics include why “family” is special (Kerry Abrams), risks and rewards of economic migration (Anu Bradford), criminal deportees (Eleanor Marie [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review, March 2013, features Louis Kaplow on multistage adjudication and Nicola Lacey on criminal justice

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 5 include:
• Article, “Multistage Adjudication,” by Louis Kaplow
• Book Review, “Humanizing the Criminal Justice Machine: Re-Animated Justice or Frankenstein’s Monster?,” by Nicola Lacey
• Note, “Importing a Trade or Business Limitation into § [...]

Full Story »

Three classic works by Neil Smelser return as quality eBook editions; two in new paperback

Comparative Methods in the Social Sciences:
Even after teaching generations of social scientists, this classic book by Berkeley’s Neil J. Smelser remains the most definitive statement of methodological issues for all comparative scholars and in political science, anthropology, sociology, economics and psychology. Such issues are timeless and therefore Smelser’s lucid analysis remains timely and relevant.
Smelser posits [...]

Full Story »

Margaret Sanger’s 1926 manual Happiness in Marriage: now a convenient eBook

Margaret Sanger (1879-1966) was an iconic American feminist, sex educator, nurse, and birth control activist. She founded Planned Parenthood and wrote numerous articles and books on controversial topics including birth control. She was arrested for espousing contraception and women’s freedom of control over their own bodies. Decades later, and in part from her prosecution and [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal, 2013, No. 4 Explores Second Amendment Analysis, Presidential Power to Appoint, Filibusters & Burqas

One of the world’s leading law journals is available as an eBook. This issue of the Yale Law Journal (the fourth of Vol. 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:
• Article: Text, History, and Tradition: What the Seventh Amendment Can Teach Us [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review’s Feb. 2013 issue explores unbundled legal aid, presidential power, preemption, human trafficking, and Indian canon

The Harvard Law Review is offered as an ebook, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper formatting. The contents of Issue 4 include:
• Article, “The Limits of Unbundled Legal Assistance: A Randomized Study in a Massachusetts District Court and Prospects for the Future,” by D. James Greiner, Cassandra Wolos Pattanayak, and Jonathan Hennessy
• Book Review, [...]

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review Fall 2012: statutory interpretation, immigration law, and is religion special?

A leading law review offers a quality ebook edition. This fourth issue of 2012 features articles from internationally recognized legal scholars, and extensive research in Comments authored by University of Chicago Law School students. Contents for the issue are:
• Elected Judges and Statutory Interpretation
by Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl & Ethan J. Leib
• Delegation in Immigration Law
by [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal’s Dec. 2012 issue covers the disappearing civil trial, grading restaurants’ cleanliness, paying witnesses, the Confrontation Clause in lower courts, and targeted killings

One of the world’s leading law journals is available in quality ebook formats. This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the third of Volume 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars.
Contents include:
• John H. Langbein, “The Disappearance of Civil Trial in the United States”
[...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review’s January 2013 issue explores politicians and redistricting, copyright reform, the independent status of the SEC, & recent cases

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition for ereaders and pads, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 3, January 2013, include:
• Article, “Politicians as Fiduciaries,” by D. Theodore Rave
• Book Review, “Is Copyright Reform Possible?” by Pamela Samuelson
• Note, “The SEC Is Not an Independent [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal Issue 2, Nov. 2012, features new articles by Karen Tani, Adrian Vermeule and Andrew Coan

One of the world’s leading law journals is available in quality ebook formats for ereader devices and apps. This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the second issue of Volume 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory, and in particular examines: the language of rights discourse, even before [...]

Full Story »

Krislov’s foundational The Negro in Federal Employment studies affirmative action at the beginning

Samuel Krislov’s much-cited study of civil rights in the U.S. civil service at a time of tumultuous change and reexamination is Digitally Remastered. Praised widely on its initial publication in 1967, the book remains an important part of the canon of literature on African American history, labor and civil service, the political science of federal [...]

Full Story »

Philip Schrag’s Counsel for the Deceived Goes Inside NYC’s First Consumer Protection Agency: Schemes, Humor and Insight

Protect the consumer. Stop the schemes and ripoffs. Make law work for the little guy. All easier said than done.
Memoirs and case studies of fraud schemes and consumer protection from an insider who helped to found New York City’s first consumer watchdog agency, Counsel for the Deceived is a funny, candid account of fraud and [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal’s 1st Issue of Academic Year 2012-2013 Examines Aggregation, Statutory Interpretation and Criminal Defense

One of the world’s leading law journals is available in quality ebook formats for ereader devices and apps. This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the first issue of Volume 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on legal theory, tort law, criminal defense representation, statutory interpretation, “branding” of celebrities and artists, and [...]

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review’s Spring 2012 Issue 2: environmental science, class actions, suing courts, and bankrupt states

The second issue of 2012 features articles and essays from recognized legal scholars. They include Eric Biber, on variations in scientific disciplines, experts, and environmental law; Frederic Bloom & Christopher Serkin, on suing courts and takings of property; Myriam Gilles & Gary Friedman, on aggregating consumer suits after the AT&T Mobility decision on class actions; [...]

Full Story »

Roscoe Pound’s The Spirit of the Common Law: Now an ebook, exploring law and sociological jurisprudence

Pound’s classic 1921 study of what law means—and the concept and history of rules, judicial process, social engineering, and legal reasoning—from the Dean of Harvard Law School and given in lectures at Dartmouth College that year. It is finally available in a high-quality ebook edition.

Digital reproductions of such classic texts are typically scanned and forgotten, [...]

Full Story »

Stanford Law Review for May 2012 explores securities class actions, municipal “home rule,” and judicial pay

Contents for the May 2012 issue include:
• The City and the Private Right of Action, by Paul A. Diller
• Securities Class Actions Against Foreign Issuers, by Merritt B. Fox
• How Much Should Judges Be Paid? An Empirical Study on the Effect of Judicial Pay on the State Bench, by James M. Anderson & Eric Helland
• Note: How Congress Could Reduce Job Discrimination by Promoting Anonymous Hiring, by David Hausman

Full Story »

Hot Topics in the Legal Profession • 2012 Analyzes Recent Events in Ethics and the Profession

Current important events in the U.S. legal profession and legal ethics, with useful research and analysis of the rules and the profession’s current status, are explored by Tulane law students from an advanced ethics seminar. Purchase of this book benefits Tulane’s Public Interest Law Foundation, a nonprofit student group that funds public interest placements and indigent client representations throughout the country.

In paperback and multiple eBook formats.

Full Story »

Cynthia Fuchs Epstein’s foundational Women in Law adds Deborah Rhode’s new Foreword: available in paperback and eBooks

Simply one of the most important and influential works in the canon of the sociology of law, Epstein’s WOMEN IN LAW is now republished (including new paperback) and available worldwide for departments of sociology, law, and gender studies — but is accessible and fascinating to a general audience, unloaded with legal or sociological jargon. It won the SCRIBES Book Award and the ABA’s Merit Award.

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review’s 2012 Issue 1: A Symposium on Understanding Education and Law, and Articles on Municipal Bankruptcy and Copyright

A leading law review now offers a quality eBook edition. This first issue of 2012 of the University of Chicago Law Review features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal and education scholars, including an extensive Symposium on understanding education and law in the United States. Topics include economic structures in education, teaching patriotism, charter [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal’s Issue 6 (April 2012) Studies WikiLeaks, Dissolving Cities, and the Interplay of Votes and Rights

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 6th issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012, Apr. 2012) features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors include Daryl Levinson (on votes and rights), Michelle Wilde Anderson (on dissolving cities), and Patricia Bella (on WikiLeaks and national security). The issue also features student contributions [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review’s March 2012 Issue Analyzes Overlap of Administrative Agencies, Prison Reform, and Recent Cases and Legislation

Featured articles in this March 2012 issue are from such recognized scholars as Jody Freeman and Jim Rossi, on the coordination of administrative agencies when they share regulatory space, and James Whitman, reviewing Bernard Harcourt’s new book on the illusion of free markets as to prisons. Student contributions explore the law relating to antitrust and [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review April 2012 Issue Studies “Traditional” Sex Discrimination, the Presidency, and Criminal Process

Featured articles and essays in the April 2012 issue are from such recognized scholars as Cary Franklin (in an article on inventing the “traditional concept” of sex discrimination), Richard Pildes (on law and the President, in an essay reviewing a book by Eric Posner and Adrian Vermeule), and Robert Weisberg (on [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal’s March 2012 Issue Features Articles on Tax Discrimination and the 26th Amendment

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 5th issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012) features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors include Ruth Mason and Michael Knoll (an article on tax discrimination), and Michael Graetz and Alvin Warren, Jr. (a featured essay also analyzing tax discrimination, and in response). Student [...]

Full Story »

Stanford Law Review’s 1st Issue of 2012 Explores Gun Rights, Federalism in Health Care Reform, Establishing Official Islam, and Lobbying

A leading law journal features a digital edition as part of its worldwide distribution, using quality ebook formatting and active links. In fact,  Stanford Law Review, in January 2011, became the first general-interest law review to release current editions in ebook formats; six previous issues from volume 63 are available in Kindle, Nook and [...]

Full Story »

Scheingold’s The Law in Political Integration Explores Federalizing the Early Forms of the EU

Really, what became the EU, from a disparate mishmash of treaties, organizations, and economic groupings. And always law, before most people could imagine the extent of political integration it would engender. But Stuart A. Scheingold saw what it could become, what law could do for that process, and analyzed the state of that process from [...]

Full Story »

Scovel’s 1962 The Chinese Ginger Jars spans two decades of tumult and transition in China

The true, captivating, and intensely personal account of an extraordinary American woman and nurse who lived, with her medical missionary husband and son, through more than two decades of transition in China. Eventually facing occupation by the Japanese, then forced to leave the newly Communist country, she provided an intimate portrait [...]

Full Story »

Smelser and Content’s Introspective Account of Hiring at Berkeley in the Mid-1970s, The Changing Academic Market is Digitally Remastered™ and in Paperback

The Changing Academic Market: General Trends and a Berkeley Case Study is the inside story and scholarly analysis of a leading sociology department’s search, during the mid-1970s, to fill several faculty positions. This was attempted in the middle of the fundamental changes to the university market that began in the 1960s and was especially acute [...]

Full Story »

Selznick’s Leadership in Administration Still a Management and Sociology Bestseller

Remarkable in its insight and staying power, Philip Selznick’s Leadership in Administration is still read in droves by business and management students, sociologists, and political scientists — and of course by interested individual readers within corporations, institutions, and governmental agencies who want to lead effectively. It forms the backbone of most accepted self-help or seminar-style management courses and guides. Quid Pro is the exclusive digital publisher of this fine book.

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review’s June Issue, in ebook formats, now available including memoriam to William Stuntz

Harvard Law Review: Volume 124, Number 8 – June 2011 is now available, beating the streets, as an ebook in leading formats. It features quality presentation, legible charts, active TOC (including that of the articles), linked notes and URLs, and complete and linked cross-referencing in text and notes.
Its contents are:
In Memoriam: William J. Stuntz
Pamela S. [...]

Full Story »

New Stanford Law Review Issue 5 Is Available in Kindle, Nook, and iTunes Formats

Now available is Stanford Law Review’s Issue 5 – May 2011.
The Stanford Law Review is published six times a year by students of the Stanford Law School. Each issue contains material written by student members of the Law Review, other Stanford law students, and outside contributors, such as law professors, judges, and practicing lawyers. The [...]

Full Story »

Virgil’s Aeneid Gets Translated to a Modern Ear and Abridged to its Essentials

New condensed and annotated edition of the epic Aeneid makes it live for new readers, and explains key words, names, and places. David Crump’s edition is lively and fast paced, and even rhymes. Ebook editions use innovative jumps to brief asides, rather than footnotes, while print editions place explanations at margins, arranged to mirror the text. Bridge summaries explain omitted parts.

Full Story »

Stanford Law Review’s new Issue 4 – April 2011 – features articles by Stephen Gillers, Omri Ben-Shahar and Others

This current issue of the Stanford Law Review contains studies of law, history, and social policy by acclaimed scholars Stephen Gillers (on the ethics of lawyers who hold real evidence in a case, such as guns, presidential tapes, and drugs), Natalie Ram (on DNA technology in family identifications, and especially its forensic use in criminal [...]

Full Story »

Stanford Law Review’s March 2011 Issue 3 Hits the Streets Early

Quid Pro, LLC is the exclusive digital publisher of the Stanford Law Review. The latest issue, Number 3 (March 2011) features cutting-edge articles by recognized scholars on such diverse topics as “preglimony,” derivatives markets in a fiscal crisis, corporate reform in Brazil, land use and zoning, and a student Note on college endowments. [...]

Full Story »

Stanford Law Review’s Issue 2 now out, in multiple ebook formats

Stanford Law Review has ebook distribution of its volumes–the first for a law review in all its current issues.  [Issue 1 (Dec. 2011) of volume 63 was already available here.] Now, Issue 2 has published in all ebook formats. It is now in Kindle and Nook, and on iTunes. It was already available in multiple [...]

Full Story »

Stanford Law Review, Vol. 63, #1 (Dec. 2010) Is Available as an Ebook

One of the most read and recognized law journals in the world has added ebook and digital distribution of its volumes.  The Stanford Law Review is edited by students at Stanford Law School and features scholarly articles in law, economics, and social policy. Quid Pro Books is the exclusive digital publisher of the Stanford Law [...]

Full Story »

Lawrence Friedman’s Mystery An Unnatural Death Takes Lawyer Frank May Into May and December

Frank May practices law, but he gets by just doing the safe, bland kind—writing wills, forming partnerships, processing papers. Everything far from the seedy adventures of criminal law or detective work. But every lawyer knows: clients have a habit of taking you to places you don’t want to be.
One of those clients is the estate [...]

Full Story »

Now out in print: Federal Standards of Review, 4th ed.

In its new Fourth Edition, in three volumes, a product of LexisNexis Publishing Co.

Full Story »

You do not need a Kindle to read our books

Read the five ways our ebooks are read by anyone whether or not they own the actual Kindle device. Plus we have PDF and rtf anyway, and paperbacks. So digital books should not scare the non-Amazon readers. Even Kindle apps for various devices are free and do not in any way require your owning a Kindle itself. Amazon just wants to sell the books, and we do too.

Full Story »

We do paper editions too

Although we specialize in quality digital publishing, we are happy to produce and sell internationally your work in paperback form, through traditional sales as well as digital.  Existing print books that have shown the market sustains print sales, for example, should be published in both forms.  And we can work with your traditional publisher to [...]

Full Story »

Submit your dissertation, get it out there, still publish traditionally if you want

Keep your options open but make your dissertation available and get it read and cited.  All while you may still work it into a newer edition for submission to traditional publishers.
Unlike some digital dissertation sites that are no more than vanit-epresses, your book will be sold on Amazon, Apple, Barnes & Noble and other traditional [...]

Full Story »
Page 2 of 212