Alison Renteln’s Classic Study of the Relativity of Human Rights Norms; Adds New Foreword by Tom Zwart

A classic socio-legal study of the incompatibility and possible reconciliation of competing views of culture relativism and absolute fundamental human rights. It features prodigious research and insight that has often been cited by academics and human rights lawyers and activists over two decades. Originally published by Sage, the book is now available in Quid Pro’s Classics of the Social Sciences Series, in new eBook and paperback editions; it remains one of the foundational works in human rights.

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Jesse Choper’s Securing Religious Liberty is Digitally Remastered™ and Available in New eBook Formats

Although the Constitution of the United States states that there shall be no laws that either establish or prohibit religion, the application of the Religion Clauses throughout United States history has been fraught with conflict and ambiguity. In this classic book, a leading constitutional scholar (and former Dean of law at Berkeley) proposed a set [...]

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Maids and Caregivers in Saudi Arabia & UAE: Antoinette Vlieger explores their conflicts, the available norms and law, and petropolitics

Part of the Human Rights & Culture Series, Antoinette Vlieger’s Domestic Workers in Saudi Arabia and the Emirates brings home, through frank interviews, the dilemmas at issue when migrant maids and caregivers make their homes in oil-rich countries. Page 1 opens with a jarring turn: “Filipina domestic worker, employed in Riyadh: ‘Really they are good [...]

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Lawrence Friedman’s Provocative The Human Rights Culture, Views the Modern Arc of Rights as a Social and Historical Phenomenon

New from the acclaimed legal historian Lawrence Friedman, professor at Stanford. He does not mind going against the grain of most writers on human rights, to ask questions about its origins and import that the previous literature sidesteps. Why, as a social and historical matter, is all the rights discourse so pervasive and near-global today?

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