Frank Zimring’s The Changing Legal World of Adolescence is Digitally Remastered™ in eBooks & in paperback

This work attempts to explain changes in the legal conception of adolescence as a stage of life and as a transition to adulthood. The intended audience includes lawyers and others—such as parents, professionals, and kids—puzzled by trends labeled “children’s liberation” and “the revolution in juvenile justice.” Much cited and long recognized as an authority, it [...]

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Malcolm Feeley’s classic Court Reform on Trial on Innovation & Failure in the Criminal Process, now Digitally Remastered™

COURT REFORM ON TRIAL is a recognized study of innovation in the process of criminal justice, and why it so often fails—despite the best intentions of judges, administrators, and reformers. The arc of innovation to disappointment is analyzed for such ideas as bail reform, pretrial diversion, speedy trials, and determinate sentencing. A much-maligned system of [...]

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Dingwall’s Social Organisation of Health Visitor Training Returns with New Preface by the Author

A book that was hard to find but much cited and well reviewed finds a new home at Quid Pro Books, in multiple digital formats, as a Digitally Remastered Book.™ Its digital edition features new material, too.
Robert Dingwall’s classic and original study of the training of health visitors (public health nurses) in the UK is [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review, Fall 2013, studies bankruptcy, precedent, copyright, and judicial good faith, plus six Comments

The University of Chicago Law Review’s 4th and final issue, Fall 2013, features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal scholars, as well as extensive student research in the form of Comments. Contents of Volume 80, Number 4, are:
ARTICLES
• Bankruptcy Law as a Liquidity Provider, by Kenneth Ayotte & David A. Skeel Jr.
• Impeaching Precedent, [...]

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Harvard Law Review, #2, Dec. 2013: Honoring Dworkin, ‘Lost’ Essay by Hart on Discretion, Article on Media Leaks, and Notes & Recent Cases

The December 2013 issue of the Harvard Law Review is dedicated to the memory of Ronald Dworkin, with In Memoriam essays offered by Richard Fallon, Jr., Charles Fried, John C.P. Goldberg, Frances Kamm, Frank Michelman, Martha Minow, and Laurence Tribe.
The issue features an article by David Pozen entitled “The Leaky Leviathan: Why the Government Condemns [...]

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Novel courtroom fiction by David Crump follows the law and reality of murder for hire in Texas

New from the author of CONFLICT OF INTEREST and THE HOLDING COMPANY: Law professor David Crump’s latest courtroom drama features Houston trial lawyer Robert Herrick, in a case that hits close to home. When his paralegal Brianna Edwards gets arrested for hiring a hit man, Herrick has to work the law [...]

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Yale Law Journal, Dec. 2013, Analyzes Patent “Construction,” Agencies vs. Litigation, Sexual “Tops,” and Religious Value

The third issue of The Yale Law Journal’s Volume 123 (Dec. 2013) features articles on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:
•  Article, “The Interpretation-Construction Distinction in Patent Law,” by Tun-Jen Chiang & Lawrence B. Solum
•  Article, “Agencies as Litigation Gatekeepers,” by David Freeman Engstrom
•  Essay,”Tops, Bottoms, and Versatiles: What Straight Views [...]

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Solomon Northup’s Twelve Years a Slave is republished in quality hardcover, paperback & eBooks

The classic and compelling narrative of the kidnapping, slavery, and freedom of a free man of color wrested to rural Louisiana. Lured to the nation’s capital by the prospect of work, Solomon Northup, a free man born in New York, is kidnapped and sold into slavery. He spends the next twelve years in brutal bondage. Paperback, hardback and eBooks, featuring readable font & additional rare imagery of the author’s life.

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Peter Gabel’s new book Another Way of Seeing: in hardcover, paperback and eBooks

In ANOTHER WAY OF SEEING, critical legal studies scholar Peter Gabel argues that our most fundamental spiritual need as human beings is the desire for authentic mutual recognition. Because we live in a world in which this desire is systematically denied due to the legacy of fear of the other that has been passed on [...]

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Yale Law Journal Nov. ‘13: Rise of Legislative History, Citizens United as a Press Case, and Mens Rea for Accomplices

The second issue of The Yale Law Journal’s Volume 123 features articles on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:
• Article, “Leviathan and Interpretive Revolution: The Administrative State, the Judiciary, and the Rise of Legislative History, 1890-1950,” by Nicholas R. Parrillo
• Essay, “Reconsidering Citizens United as a Press Clause Case,” Michael W. [...]

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Exploring Disaster from a global and sociological perspective; new book joins the Contemporary Society Series

Legal governance of disaster brings both care and punishment to the upending of daily life of place-based disasters. National states use disasters to reorganize how they govern. The collection in Disaster and Sociolegal Studies, edited by Denver University professor Susan Sterett, considers how law is implicated in disaster. The late modern expectation that states are [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s Nov. 2013 issue reviews Supreme Court’s last Term, honors Justice Ginsburg, and features Siegel, Issacharoff, Klarman & Murphy

The November issue, Number 1, is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court’s previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2012 Term, articles and essays include:
• Foreword: “Equality Divided,” by Reva B. Siegel
• Comment: “Beyond the Discrimination Model on [...]

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Everett Hughes’ Classic Study Men and Their Work is a Digitally Remastered Book™

Quality ebook and paperback reprint of a classic work in the social sciences, written by one of the leading scholars on the intersection of work and sociology. This is an unabridged republication of this much-cited study first published in 1958 and re-released in 1981. Presented with care, the ebook edition features such proper digital formatting [...]

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David Nelken adds new preface, and paperback and ebooks, to his award-winning study The Limits of the Legal Process

This classic and path-breaking study in the sociology of law has won multiple academic awards for its insight, clarity, and broad import in examining the UK’s Rent Acts and landlord behavior over a period of time in the 1960s and 1970s. Not just a revelation of the unintended consequences of well-meaning tenant reforms–though it certainly [...]

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Joseph Story’s Constitutional Commentaries Returns (Hardcover, Paperback & eBook); Adds New Intro by Penn’s Kermit Roosevelt

Justice Joseph Story’s famous and influential review of the origins, influences, and early interpretations of the Constitution is now presented in the author’s own 1833 Abridged Edition—considered the most useful and readable version of this important work, written by the Supreme Court’s youngest member. No other ebook version offers the accessible [...]

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Yale Law Journal’s first issue of Vol. 123 explores racial disparity in sentencing, gun control, unions, and special juries

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (Volume 123, No. 1, Oct. 2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:

• Article, “Mandatory Sentencing and Racial Disparity: Assessing the Role of Prosecutors and the Effects of Booker,” by Sonja B. Starr & M. Marit Rehavi
• Article, “Firearm [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review’s issue 3 of 2013 explores tortfest, constitutionality, nudges and floodgates

The University of Chicago Law Review’s third issue, 2013, features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal scholars, as well as extensive student research in the form of Comments. Contents are:
ARTICLES
• Tortfest, by J. Shahar Dillbary
• Judging the Flood of Litigation, by Marin K. Levy
• Unbundling Constitutionality, by Richard Primus
• When Nudges Fail: Slippery Defaults, [...]

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Jesse Choper’s powerful Judicial Review and the National Political Process available as an eBook

As constitutional scholar John Nowak noted when this classic book was first published, “Professor Choper’s Judicial Review and the National Political Process is mandatory reading for anyone seriously attempting to study our constitutional system of government. It is an important assessment of the democratic process and the theoretical and practical role of the Supreme Court.”
That [...]

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Simon Roberts’ acclaimed legal anthropology Order and Dispute: now in Second Edition

A classic resource in the modern study of the anthropology of law, the much-cited and rare book is now widely available again. There are many societies that survive in a remarkably orderly fashion without the help of judges, courts and police. Roberts contends, however, that legal theory has become too closely identified with our own arrangements in western societies to help much in cross-cultural studies of order.

Now in an updated edition, in paperback and eBook formats.

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Revolutionary, classic book Cybernetics: now in quality eBook, hardcover, and paperback editions

CYBERNETICS is on virtually everyone’s short list of the most important and influential nonfiction books of the last century. First published by MIT math professor Norbert Wiener in 1948, and later expanded in its Second Edition in 1961, this groundbreaking account of systems, thought processes, AI, and the use of “feedback” [...]

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4th edition of Jerome Skolnick’s Classic Justice Without Trial Explores Policing and Democratic Values from Inside

Available in multiple ebook formats and paperback: the acclaimed and foundational study of police culture and practice, political accountability, application of and obedience to the rule of law in stops and arrests, and the dilemma of law versus order in free societies — by the renowned sociologist using innovative and influential research techniques in law and criminology. New preface by the author and Foreword by Candace McCoy.

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Stuart Scheingold’s Pathbreaking Study of European Integration by Law is a Digitally Remastered Book

In the early days of what would become the European Union, the new entity had a weak and ill-defined legislature and executive. And the European Court of Justice, whose decisions, actions, and even inactions subtly paved the way to a continent’s integration. “Scheingold showed that its efforts, deftly melding law and politics, were a success beyond mere dispute-resolution and development of legal doctrine,” states the new introduction to this classic study. “He was well aware that he was present at the creation of a powerful new institution. Yet he stood virtually alone in seeing what such an institution, using its power this way, could realize in terms of political integration. The resulting book was a masterpiece.”

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Yale Law Journal’s Special Symposium: The Gideon Effect, 50 Years Later (Issue 8, June 2013)

This final issue of The Yale Law Journal’s Volume 122 features “Symposium: The Gideon Effect: Rights, Justice, and Lawyers Fifty Years After Gideon v. Wainwright.“ The year 2013 marks the golden anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark ruling in Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), which established a constitutional right to counsel for criminal defendants. A [...]

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Harry Scheiber’s classic study of Wilson and civil liberties is back in print … and in eBooks

The Wilson Administration and Civil Liberties, 1917-1921, is a Digitally Remastered™ reprint of one of the classic works of legal and social history. Harry Scheiber’s much-cited study of Woodrow Wilson and his cabinet explores the suppression of speech and print publication during an era of world war, the Red Scare, anti-foreign fervor, and unionism.
Wilson’s notable [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review’s 2nd issue of 2013: conflicting property schemes, scrutiny tiers & constitutional theory, federalism, elections & reapportionment, and advisory opinions to the courts

The University of Chicago Law Review’s new issue features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal and policy scholars. Contents include:
• Article, “Property Lost in Translation,” by Abraham Bell & Gideon Parchomovsky
• Article, “Tiers of Scrutiny in Enumerated Powers Jurisprudence,” by Aziz Z. Huq
• Article, “State and Federal Models of the Interaction between Statutes and [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s June 2013 Issue Covers Racial Capitalism, Shallow Signals, Heirs, and Civil Rights Lawyers

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents and URLs, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 8 include:
• Article, “Racial Capitalism,” by Nancy Leong
• Essay, “Shallow Signals,” by Bert I. Huang
• Book Review, “All Unhappy Families: Tales of Old Age, Rational Actors, and the Disordered Life,” by [...]

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John Logue’s 3 Ballantine Murder Mysteries are now QP eBooks

Classic mystery writer John Logue has contributed some of his most acclaimed fiction to the growing eBook library of QP fiction. Now available are three suspense novels set in the world of high-stakes sports. Originally published by Crown Publishing and Ballantine Books of Random House, these books formed  part of the Morris & Sullivan Mystery [...]

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Yale Law Journal, May 2013: Zoning, Eminent Domain, Nudges to Paternalism, and Patents

The 7th issue of The Yale Law Journal features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:
• “City Unplanning,” by David Schleicher
• “Rethinking the Federal Eminent Domain Power,” by William Baude
• “Behavioral Economics and Paternalism,” by Cass R. Sunstein
• “The Continuum of Excludability and the Limits of Patents,” [...]

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Alison Renteln’s Classic Study of the Relativity of Human Rights Norms; Adds New Foreword by Tom Zwart

A classic socio-legal study of the incompatibility and possible reconciliation of competing views of culture relativism and absolute fundamental human rights. It features prodigious research and insight that has often been cited by academics and human rights lawyers and activists over two decades. Originally published by Sage, the book is now available in Quid Pro’s Classics of the Social Sciences Series, in new eBook and paperback editions; it remains one of the foundational works in human rights.

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Harvard Law Review’s May 2013 Symposium on Privacy & Tech; Issue Adds Articles on Administrative Review and the OIRA

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, active URLs in notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 7 include scholarly articles and student case notes, as well as an extensive Symposium on Privacy and Technology. Subjects include:
Article, “Agency Self-Insulation Under [...]

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Lawrence Friedman’s novel of lawyer Frank May proves where there’s a will there’s a death

Frank May practices law, but not the glamorous kind. His bread and butter is the sedate sort—writing wills and handling estates. Or more to the point, handling heirs.
Even so, where there’s a will there’s a death. Try as he might, Frank just can’t avoid some of the more unsavory sides of human existence. And of [...]

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Reinhard Bendix’s influential Work and Authority in Industry is now an eBook

Work and Authority in Industry is a high quality, Digitally Remastered™ republication of one of the classic works of social history and industrial relations. Reinhard Bendix’s foundational study of the rise of the capitalist class is now presented as an eBook.
This book has been assigned, quoted, and referenced thousands of times since its [...]

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Yale Law Journal, Apr. 2013: Rape-by-deception, abuse of property rights, civil rights lawyering, bankuptcy ride-through, and age & organ donors

The April 2013 issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 6th of Vol. 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on law, legal theory and policy by internationally recognized scholars.
Contents include an article analyzing rape-by-deception and the mythical idea of sexual autonomy, by Jed Rubenfeld; an essay on extortion and the principle of [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s April 2013 Issue features Developments on Immigration, Coase Theorem, and “Unwritten” Constitution

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 6 include scholarly articles and student case notes, as well as as the extensive, annual survey of emerging Developments in the Law. This year’s subject is immigration law [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review’s Symposium on Immigration Features Leading Scholars in the Field

This first issue of 2013 features articles from internationally recognized scholars on immigration and emigration, including an extensive Symposium on immigration and its issues of policy, law, administrative process, and institutional design in the United States.
Topics include why “family” is special (Kerry Abrams), risks and rewards of economic migration (Anu Bradford), criminal deportees (Eleanor Marie [...]

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Harvard Law Review, March 2013, features Louis Kaplow on multistage adjudication and Nicola Lacey on criminal justice

The Harvard Law Review is offered in a digital edition, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook formatting. The contents of Issue 5 include:
• Article, “Multistage Adjudication,” by Louis Kaplow
• Book Review, “Humanizing the Criminal Justice Machine: Re-Animated Justice or Frankenstein’s Monster?,” by Nicola Lacey
• Note, “Importing a Trade or Business Limitation into § [...]

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Yale Law Journal’s March 2013 Issue Features Antitrust, Federalism, and Burden of Proof

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 5th of Vol. 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal history. Contents include:
• Article: “Commandeering and Constitutional Change,” by Wesley Campbell
• Article: “Parallel Exclusion,” by C. Scott Hemphill & Tim Wu
• Essay: “Reconceptualizing the Burden of Proof,” by Edward [...]

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Three classic works by Neil Smelser return as quality eBook editions; two in new paperback

Comparative Methods in the Social Sciences:
Even after teaching generations of social scientists, this classic book by Berkeley’s Neil J. Smelser remains the most definitive statement of methodological issues for all comparative scholars and in political science, anthropology, sociology, economics and psychology. Such issues are timeless and therefore Smelser’s lucid analysis remains timely and relevant.
Smelser posits [...]

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Margaret Sanger’s 1926 manual Happiness in Marriage: now a convenient eBook

Margaret Sanger (1879-1966) was an iconic American feminist, sex educator, nurse, and birth control activist. She founded Planned Parenthood and wrote numerous articles and books on controversial topics including birth control. She was arrested for espousing contraception and women’s freedom of control over their own bodies. Decades later, and in part from her prosecution and [...]

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Jesse Choper’s Securing Religious Liberty is Digitally Remastered™ and Available in New eBook Formats

Although the Constitution of the United States states that there shall be no laws that either establish or prohibit religion, the application of the Religion Clauses throughout United States history has been fraught with conflict and ambiguity. In this classic book, a leading constitutional scholar (and former Dean of law at Berkeley) proposed a set [...]

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Marie Laveau, historical voodoo figure in New Orleans, featured in reprinted classic folk-book

Raymond J. Martinez’ classic book on legends, lore and unvarnished truths surrounding New Orleans’ most famous voodoo mistress, and other tales from surrounding parishes of days long gone by. Includes illustrated guide to palm-reading, humorous asides, historical comparisons, and over twenty images. In addition to the facts and folklore about Marie Laveau herself, including revealing [...]

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Yale Law Journal, 2013, No. 4 Explores Second Amendment Analysis, Presidential Power to Appoint, Filibusters & Burqas

One of the world’s leading law journals is available as an eBook. This issue of the Yale Law Journal (the fourth of Vol. 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:
• Article: Text, History, and Tradition: What the Seventh Amendment Can Teach Us [...]

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Maids and Caregivers in Saudi Arabia & UAE: Antoinette Vlieger explores their conflicts, the available norms and law, and petropolitics

Part of the Human Rights & Culture Series, Antoinette Vlieger’s Domestic Workers in Saudi Arabia and the Emirates brings home, through frank interviews, the dilemmas at issue when migrant maids and caregivers make their homes in oil-rich countries. Page 1 opens with a jarring turn: “Filipina domestic worker, employed in Riyadh: ‘Really they are good [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s Feb. 2013 issue explores unbundled legal aid, presidential power, preemption, human trafficking, and Indian canon

The Harvard Law Review is offered as an ebook, featuring active Contents, linked notes, and proper formatting. The contents of Issue 4 include:
• Article, “The Limits of Unbundled Legal Assistance: A Randomized Study in a Massachusetts District Court and Prospects for the Future,” by D. James Greiner, Cassandra Wolos Pattanayak, and Jonathan Hennessy
• Book Review, [...]

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Origins of World War I by Durkheim and Denis: Who Wanted War?

A historic monograph about the origins of World War I. Two famed University of Paris professors document their “brief” on the diplomatic and historic causes of the Great War, and especially its spread throughout Europe. Published early on in the conflict—as current events—the tract serves as a fascinating rebuttal to the usual assumptions.

It was not just about Sarajevo.

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Scientific Evidence and the Law-Science Divide: Book by Cedric Gilson Offers Reconciliation Analysis

THE LAW-SCIENCE CHASM is a new socio-legal study that takes seriously the varying approaches to science that physicians and scientists use, as compared to legal actors such as judges and lawyers. Offering a way to mediate and translate their different perspectives and assumptions, Gilson uses sociological and philosophical methodologies to explain [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review Fall 2012: statutory interpretation, immigration law, and is religion special?

A leading law review offers a quality ebook edition. This fourth issue of 2012 features articles from internationally recognized legal scholars, and extensive research in Comments authored by University of Chicago Law School students. Contents for the issue are:
• Elected Judges and Statutory Interpretation
by Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl & Ethan J. Leib
• Delegation in Immigration Law
by [...]

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Yale Law Journal’s Dec. 2012 issue covers the disappearing civil trial, grading restaurants’ cleanliness, paying witnesses, the Confrontation Clause in lower courts, and targeted killings

One of the world’s leading law journals is available in quality ebook formats. This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the third of Volume 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars.
Contents include:
• John H. Langbein, “The Disappearance of Civil Trial in the United States”
[...]

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Truscott’s Command Missions: Inside account of World War II’s European Theater, now a Digitally Remastered Book™

“You play games to win, not lose. And you fight wars to win. That’s spelled W-I-N! And every good player in a game and every good commander in a war … has to have some son of a bitch in him. If he doesn’t, he isn’t a good player or commander…. It’s [...]

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Samuel Krislov’s Representative Bureaucracy is back in paperback, hardcover & eBooks

“Professor Samuel Krislov’s Representative Bureaucracy remains among the most important and enduring books in the field of public administration and its intersection with political science. It takes the kernel of the idea, inchoately introduced in J. Donald Kingsley’s 1944 book by the same title, that public bureaucracies can be representative political institutions and it develops [...]

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