Stanford Law Review’s Feb. 2012 Issue #2 Explores National Security, Thought Control, and Shareholder Liability

Contents for this February 2012 issue (Vol. 64, #2) include:
• “National Security Federalism in the Age of Terror”
By Matthew C. Waxman
• “Incriminating Thoughts”
By Nita A. Farahany
• “Elective Shareholder Liability”
By Peter Conti-Brown
• Note, “Harrington’s Wake: Unanswered Questions on AEDPA’s Application to Summary Dispositions”
By Matthew Seligman
• Comment, “Boumediene Applied Badly: The Extraterritorial Constitution After Al Maqaleh v. [...]

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Hardback, paperback & ebook: Rosen on the Roles and Dilemmas of Attorneys in Advising Corporations

Acclaimed study in law & society — already used and cited for its path-breaking research — passed around before in looseleaf, now available worldwide as a new book. Features new Foreword and Preface. In paperback, cloth and multiple digital formats. Called a “cult classic” and “wonderful” in recent blog posts.

“…Should be read by everyone interested in how law matters to organizations of all kinds.” –Prof. Jonathan Simon, UC Berkeley School of Law

“A pioneering work in the sociology of the legal profession and a foundational piece in the slowly emerging canon of empirical research on inside counsel…normatively challenges the legal profession’s ideology of moral ‘independence.’” — Prof. Sung Hui Kim, UCLA, from the new Foreword

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Yale Law Journal’s Issue 6 (April 2012) Studies WikiLeaks, Dissolving Cities, and the Interplay of Votes and Rights

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 6th issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012, Apr. 2012) features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors include Daryl Levinson (on votes and rights), Michelle Wilde Anderson (on dissolving cities), and Patricia Bella (on WikiLeaks and national security). The issue also features student contributions [...]

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Michael O’Neal’s new Slavery, Smallholding and Tourism Examines the British Virgin Islands with Anthropology and History

Explores the political economy of development in the BVI — from plantations, through a smallholding economy, to the rise of tourism. The demise of plantations ushered in a century of imperial disinterest, then a new “monocrop” — tourism — became ascendant. Using an historical and anthropological approach, O’Neal shows how later reliance on tourism and other dependent industries affects many BVIslanders — called the “Belongers” — in ways that echo their historical and economic heritage.
NEW IN PAPERBACK, HARDCOVER, and multiple eBOOK FORMATS.

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Anthology of Key West’s Greatest Writers Includes Hemingway, Dos Passos, Tennessee Williams, Hunter Thompson, and Elizabeth Bishop

The Key West Reader features 25 of the most insightful and entertaining works that resonate from Key West: an edited collection of the finest literary and poetic works about Key West or from writers who lived in, or were touched by their time in, the Florida island community. It is said that Key West hosts [...]

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Martin Shapiro Links Freedom of Speech with the Legitimate Political Role of the Supreme Court

A classic study of the free speech right and especially the function of the Supreme Court in review—in effect answering, before his time, Chief Justice Roberts’ claim that judges are neutral umpires. Such judicial modesty ignores the Court’s political role in governing and protecting under-represented citizens.

In paperback edition, plus Kindle, Nook, Apple, and other ebook formats.

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Harvard Law Review’s March 2012 Issue Analyzes Overlap of Administrative Agencies, Prison Reform, and Recent Cases and Legislation

Featured articles in this March 2012 issue are from such recognized scholars as Jody Freeman and Jim Rossi, on the coordination of administrative agencies when they share regulatory space, and James Whitman, reviewing Bernard Harcourt’s new book on the illusion of free markets as to prisons. Student contributions explore the law relating to antitrust and [...]

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Harvard Law Review April 2012 Issue Studies “Traditional” Sex Discrimination, the Presidency, and Criminal Process

Featured articles and essays in the April 2012 issue are from such recognized scholars as Cary Franklin (in an article on inventing the “traditional concept” of sex discrimination), Richard Pildes (on law and the President, in an essay reviewing a book by Eric Posner and Adrian Vermeule), and Robert Weisberg (on [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s Feb. 2012 Issue Features Articles by Amanda Tyler and Kenneth Mack, Plus Recent Cases

Featured articles are from such recognized scholars as Amanda Tyler, on the core meaning of the Suspension Clause, and Kenneth Mack, reviewing Brown-Nagin’s book on the grass roots origins of the civil rights movement. Also, several judges and professors write a tribute honoring Frank Michelman. In Kindle, Apple and Nook.

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Yale Law Journal’s March 2012 Issue Features Articles on Tax Discrimination and the 26th Amendment

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 5th issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012) features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors include Ruth Mason and Michael Knoll (an article on tax discrimination), and Michael Graetz and Alvin Warren, Jr. (a featured essay also analyzing tax discrimination, and in response). Student [...]

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Meltsner’s novel Short Takes, on the angst and trials of an urban lawyer, republished to eBook and paperback

Novel, first published by Random House, about a liberal lawyer’s urban journeys in New York, facing the angst of seeing his work undone by institutional inertia and his relationships undone by indecision and the handcuffs of people’s expected roles. “…Engaging and extremely well written first novel, creates a character of enormous vitality and considerable charm, funny, caring…” –Boston Globe

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Yale Law Journal’s Issue 4, January 2012, Features Kaplow on burdens of proof and essays on sovereign debt and bankruptcy

This issue of Yale Law Journal features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors are Louis Kaplow (on burdens of proof and their reasons), Richard Schragger (on democracy and debt), and Anna Gelpern (on quasi-sovereign bankruptcy). Also features student contributions on guilty pleas and on voting rights.

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Selznick’s Leadership in Administration, Exploring Institutional Character and Commitment, Is Digitally Remastered

Foundational and influential analysis of how institutions work and how leadership promotes them. Featuring a substantive introduction by Robert Rosen, Philip Selznick’s great book — it practically invented the genre of executive leadership studies and is the lively response to the “rationalist” approach to organizations — is re-released in ebooks. Adopted in courses on sociology, management, organizations, and leadership for business … also government and the military. Original pagination is included.

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Stanford Law Review’s 1st Issue of 2012 Explores Gun Rights, Federalism in Health Care Reform, Establishing Official Islam, and Lobbying

A leading law journal features a digital edition as part of its worldwide distribution, using quality ebook formatting and active links. In fact,  Stanford Law Review, in January 2011, became the first general-interest law review to release current editions in ebook formats; six previous issues from volume 63 are available in Kindle, Nook and [...]

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January 2012 Harvard Law Review: Rebecca Tushnet on Reimagining Copyright Law and Carol Steiker on the Contingency of Capital Punishment

Produced and available before the print edition is publicly released, the eBook edition of the latest issue of the Harvard Law Review features compelling scholarship and research from Rebecca Tushnet, Carol Steiker, and student members of the journal. Quid Pro Books is the exclusive eBook publisher of Harvard Law Review. Offered in a digital edition [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review for fall 2011 examines regulatory empiricism, statutory interpretation, insurance policy variations, and jury nullification

A leading law review in an eBook edition. This final issue of 2011 features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal scholars and governmental leaders, including Cass Sunstein (on empirically informed regulation), Jonathan Bressler (on jury nullification and Reconstruction), Daniel Schwarcz (on standardized insurance policies), and Bertral Ross II (writing against constitutional mainstreaming in statutory [...]

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Baltimore and the 19th of April, 1861 is a first-hand account of the beginning of the Civil War in a contested border state

A vivid and fascinating first-person account of Maryland at the beginning of the Civil War, its Southern sympathizers and support for slavery, the attempted assassination of Lincoln, and the 1861 riots that tore Baltimore apart and brought the Union and martial law to the border state that fringed the nation’s capital.  Author George William Brown [...]

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Lawrence Friedman’s Mystery The Book Club Murder Drags Lawyer Frank May into his Wife’s Domain

Frank May hates trouble, as a lawyer and as a guy. But it likes him just fine. For someone who practices wills and trusts law because it is far from the scene of murder and mayhem, he has a knack for being caught up in it anyway.
Which is why he thought he was fortune’s friend [...]

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Acclaimed sociologist Amitai Etzioni’s newest book plays Law in a New Key

Most issues of law and social policy can be understood better through a lens that balances rights and interests –and protects all of us while protecting each of us–says Etzioni in his latest of 30 books. Explores drone wars, TSA scanners, internet privacy, norms, terrorism, shaming, and DNA banks.
In paperback and eight digital formats for all e-readers.

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A Dictionary of Civil Law Terminology in Louisiana: Usufruct and Naked Owners Are Explained to Common Lawyers and Civilians

With obscure terms like emphyteusis and jactitation, the language of the civil law can sometimes confuse students and even seasoned practitioners. But the Louisiana Civil Law Dictionary can help. It defines every word and phrase contained in the index to the Louisiana Civil Code, plus many more–in clear and concise language–and provides current citations to [...]

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Eleanor Lothrop’s Throw Me a Bone Tells of Adventures in Archaeology in South America

“If you marry a man it is presumably because you like the man and not, necessarily, his profession. Marrying a mortician or a dentist, for instance, does not presuppose a passionate interest in and a knowledge of embalming or filling teeth. Yet an archaeologist’s bride is expected to emerge from the [...]

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Yale Law Journal’s December 2011 Issue (No. 3): Masur on Patent Inflation and Gluck on Federalism in Health Reform

One of the world’s leading law journals is available in quality eBook formats for eReader devices and apps. This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the third issue of Volume 121, Dec. 2011, academic year 2011-2012) features articles on “patent inflation” and on implementing federal health care reform within a state under principles of federalism. [...]

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Scheingold’s The Law in Political Integration Explores Federalizing the Early Forms of the EU

Really, what became the EU, from a disparate mishmash of treaties, organizations, and economic groupings. And always law, before most people could imagine the extent of political integration it would engender. But Stuart A. Scheingold saw what it could become, what law could do for that process, and analyzed the state of that process from [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s annual issue reviewing Supreme Court Term, and scholarly Foreword, now out in Kindle, Apple, and Nook formats

Issue number 1 of the academic year 2011-12 is now available, HLR’s November 2011 issue analyzing the 2010 Term of the U.S. Supreme Court. This special issue is read widely for its summaries and analyses of the law in cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal statutes and jurisdiction, patent law, and many other subjects recently [...]

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Classic Study of Solo Lawyers: Jerome Carlin’s Lawyers on Their Own Gets Digitally Remastered™

A classic study, in 2011 digital and paperback formats, with a new foreword by law professor William Gallagher.

Carlin’s LAWYERS ON THEIR OWN is a recognized, foundational study of lawyers in solo practice in an urban setting. It became the template for an important form of social science research into lawyers in action. The first frank, extensive and grounded study of individual practitioners, now back in print, plus nine quality digital formats.

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Classic legal history, adding new Foreword by Stewart Macaulay: Lawrence Friedman’s Contract Law in America

Contract law and legal history as applied in the real world and not just in the law books—a classic study of the social and economic realities of trade law, told through case studies and rich historical analysis, and comparing cases and legislation over three discrete historical periods. Lawrence Friedman’s first book, with new introductions, is now in paperback and eight accessible digital formats.

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Yale Law Journal is available in quality ebook formats, starting with Oct. 2011 issue

One of the world’s leading law journals is now available in quality ebook formats for ereader devices and apps. This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the first issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012) features new articles and essays on jurisprudence, tort law, and other areas of interest. Contributors include such noted scholars as Jules Coleman, Ariel Porat, and Mark Geistfeld. The issue also features student contributions on counter-terrorism and on felon disenfranchisement.

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Scovel’s 1962 The Chinese Ginger Jars spans two decades of tumult and transition in China

The true, captivating, and intensely personal account of an extraordinary American woman and nurse who lived, with her medical missionary husband and son, through more than two decades of transition in China. Eventually facing occupation by the Japanese, then forced to leave the newly Communist country, she provided an intimate portrait [...]

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Auerbach’s Brothers at War Explores the Altalena and Today’s Implications: An Israeli Ship Destroyed By Israeli Soldiers

All-new in summer 2011: Jerold Auerbach’s probing and poignant exploration of the tragedy of the Altalena, the doomed ship whose arrival in Israel ignited Jewish fratricidal conflict only weeks after the 1948 declaration of statehood. This new book is the first on the Altalena by a historian, the first to explore it within the context of ancient Jewish and contemporary Israeli history. In ebooks, hardcover, and paperback.

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Harvard Law Review’s Dec. 2011 Issue as an eBook: Orin Kerr, Jamal Greene and Michael Klarman

The Harvard Law Review’s December 2011 Issue (Volume 125, Number 2) is available in quality eBook editions from Quid Pro Books.
Articles in this issue are from such recognized scholars as Jamal Greene (writing on notorious or anti-canonical Supreme Court cases like Lochner and Plessy), Orin Kerr (on Fourth Amendment theory), and Michael Klarman (reviewing in [...]

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JM Review of IP Law Special Symposium Issue on Biotech and Health Issues

One of the leading IP law journals in the world presents it second special symposium issue to go ebook (the 2010 issue, available as well, centered on the “green” movement and its intellectual property law issues). This current edition of John Marshall RIPL is the new 2011 Special Issue, with seven cutting-edge articles from recognized lawyers and scholars of IP law and biotech/health sciences. In ebook formats.

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Detailed Stanford Law Review Symposium on Patent Law After Bilski v. Kappos

This new issue is a special June 2011 Symposium, featuring cutting-edge articles on patent law and other IP issues related to genetic and biotech innovation and “business methods” — after the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bilski and beyond: “The Future of Patents.” Contributors include such internationally recognized IP scholars as John Duffy, Peter Menell, Mark Lemley, Michael Risch, Polk Wagner, Ted Sichelman, Rochelle Dreyfuss, and Robin Feldman.

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Smelser and Content’s Introspective Account of Hiring at Berkeley in the Mid-1970s, The Changing Academic Market is Digitally Remastered™ and in Paperback

The Changing Academic Market: General Trends and a Berkeley Case Study is the inside story and scholarly analysis of a leading sociology department’s search, during the mid-1970s, to fill several faculty positions. This was attempted in the middle of the fundamental changes to the university market that began in the 1960s and was especially acute [...]

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Discretion to Disobey: a classic of law & society

Kadish and Kadish, Discretion to Disobey, is a truly interdisciplinary inquiry into the idea of departing from the strict letter of the law in a way that, the authors argue, actually comports with both law and morality.

Sometimes you have to break the law to make the law.

AVAILABLE IN MODERN PAPERBACK or as an ebook from Amazon, Sony, Barnes & Noble, Apple iBooks, and Smashwords.

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Selznick’s Leadership in Administration Still a Management and Sociology Bestseller

Remarkable in its insight and staying power, Philip Selznick’s Leadership in Administration is still read in droves by business and management students, sociologists, and political scientists — and of course by interested individual readers within corporations, institutions, and governmental agencies who want to lead effectively. It forms the backbone of most accepted self-help or seminar-style management courses and guides. Quid Pro is the exclusive digital publisher of this fine book.

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Harvard Law Review’s June Issue, in ebook formats, now available including memoriam to William Stuntz

Harvard Law Review: Volume 124, Number 8 – June 2011 is now available, beating the streets, as an ebook in leading formats. It features quality presentation, legible charts, active TOC (including that of the articles), linked notes and URLs, and complete and linked cross-referencing in text and notes.
Its contents are:
In Memoriam: William J. Stuntz
Pamela S. [...]

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New Stanford Law Review Issue 5 Is Available in Kindle, Nook, and iTunes Formats

Now available is Stanford Law Review’s Issue 5 – May 2011.
The Stanford Law Review is published six times a year by students of the Stanford Law School. Each issue contains material written by student members of the Law Review, other Stanford law students, and outside contributors, such as law professors, judges, and practicing lawyers. The [...]

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Neil Smelser explains Sociological Theory in a clear and pithy book on how to read, criticize, and do theory

Renowned sociologist Neil J. Smelser republishes his classic and clear guide, Sociological Theory — A Contemporary View. It remains timeless because he uses foundational examples such as Durkheim, Marx and Parsons, examining still-applicable criteria. New Foreword by Arlie Hochschild, new Preface by the author.

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Jones’ Introspective, Candid Memoir About Living with Mental Illness as a Law Professor, A Hidden Madness: Available in eBooks

James Jones’ acclaimed A Hidden Madness tells the story of an accomplished individual who has reached the pinnacle of his profession despite suffering for over thirty years from the severe mental illness bipolar disorder. He has done so mostly in silence because of fear of stigma. Extreme childhood bullying helped cause his condition, which has [...]

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Virgil’s Aeneid Gets Translated to a Modern Ear and Abridged to its Essentials

New condensed and annotated edition of the epic Aeneid makes it live for new readers, and explains key words, names, and places. David Crump’s edition is lively and fast paced, and even rhymes. Ebook editions use innovative jumps to brief asides, rather than footnotes, while print editions place explanations at margins, arranged to mirror the text. Bridge summaries explain omitted parts.

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7th 2011 Issue of Harvard Law Review, May 2011, Available in Ebook Formats

The Harvard Law Review is now offered in a digital edition for ereaders — featuring active Contents, linked footnotes, active URLs in citations, and proper ebook formatting. Available download sites are linked below.
The Harvard Law Review is a student-run organization whose primary purpose is to publish a  journal of legal scholarship. The Review comes out [...]

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G. Edward White describes Patterns of American Legal Thought

A renowned legal historian at UVA and author of 14 books republishes his collection of astute and timeless essays on such subjects as the method and debates of legal history; the truth about Holmes and Brandeis; the legal realism school and its critics; the development of gay rights in constitutional law; and the origins of tort law.

In digital formats and new, modern paperback edition.

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Stuart Scheingold’s classic The Politics of Law and Order reissued in print and digital with new Foreword by Malcolm Feeley

How crime and public fear of it are socially constructed — not just a set reality to observe. Politicians and others use public anxiety for their purposes, and push a ‘law and order’ platform even as crime rates drop. As the foundational, supported study of the issue, it’s often cited and used in later scholarship on crime and politics, from a legendary scholar in the field–an acclaimed follow-up to his landmark ‘The Politics of Rights.’ Available in ebook and print formats.

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Stanford Law Review’s new Issue 4 – April 2011 – features articles by Stephen Gillers, Omri Ben-Shahar and Others

This current issue of the Stanford Law Review contains studies of law, history, and social policy by acclaimed scholars Stephen Gillers (on the ethics of lawyers who hold real evidence in a case, such as guns, presidential tapes, and drugs), Natalie Ram (on DNA technology in family identifications, and especially its forensic use in criminal [...]

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Stanford Law Review’s March 2011 Issue 3 Hits the Streets Early

Quid Pro, LLC is the exclusive digital publisher of the Stanford Law Review. The latest issue, Number 3 (March 2011) features cutting-edge articles by recognized scholars on such diverse topics as “preglimony,” derivatives markets in a fiscal crisis, corporate reform in Brazil, land use and zoning, and a student Note on college endowments. [...]

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Yale Law Journal Nov. 2011 Issue on International Law and Downsizing Government

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the second issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012) features articles on new ideas in enforcing international law, and on the role of incentives and disincentives under the idea of limited government. Contributors include the noted scholars Oona Hathaway, Scott J. Shapiro, Benjamin Ewing, and Douglas A. Kysar. The issue also features student contributions on sentencing guidelines and the historical argument for Presidential war powers.

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Pérez Perdomo Examines Law, Politics and Justice in Justicia e Injusticias en Venezuela

The new Spanish-language analysis of institutions of law, politics, and reform in Venezuela 1780-2000, from the nation’s leading voice. Even though seeking justice is an undoubted good, the history of that effort has sometimes resulted in the creation of machinery and policies that have perversely resulted in massive injustices.  This book is the culmination of [...]

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Stanford Law Review’s Issue 2 now out, in multiple ebook formats

Stanford Law Review has ebook distribution of its volumes–the first for a law review in all its current issues.  [Issue 1 (Dec. 2011) of volume 63 was already available here.] Now, Issue 2 has published in all ebook formats. It is now in Kindle and Nook, and on iTunes. It was already available in multiple [...]

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Dr. Woodrow Wilson explains history and structure of governments in U.S., including local and state variations

Before he was the 28th U.S. President and the Nobel Peace Prize winner, Wilson wrote popular books on history and civics. This text, used in schools in many countries for decades, explains local and federal units including courts, executive agencies. Know the difference between a town and township?

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Stanford Law Review, Vol. 63, #1 (Dec. 2010) Is Available as an Ebook

One of the most read and recognized law journals in the world has added ebook and digital distribution of its volumes.  The Stanford Law Review is edited by students at Stanford Law School and features scholarly articles in law, economics, and social policy. Quid Pro Books is the exclusive digital publisher of the Stanford Law [...]

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