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About achildress

See the Our Series Editors page under "Publisher Info" bar to find out more about the publisher.
Website: http://www.quidprolaw.com
achildress has written 311 articles so far, you can find them below.


Thomas Reed Powell’s classic Vagaries and Varieties of Constitutional Interpretation is digitally remastered to new eBooks; and in paperback

The classic study of historical and then-emerging ways in which the U.S. Constitution has been interpreted and applied, especially as regards judicial power to review congressional acts, sharing of power between states and the federal government, Lochnerism, the change in the Supreme Court during the Roosevelt years, taxing power, and interstate commerce. Thomas Reed Powell [...]

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Abbott and Johnson’s classic study of public administration in ancient Rome is republished as digitally remastered

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE is Frank Abbott and Allan Johnson’s classic and much-cited study of the origins of professional administration and bureaucracy in the Roman Empire. The text features source materials and extensive notes, including municipal documents in Greek and Latin from Italy and the provinces, as well as [...]

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Lawyer, Train Robber, Convict, Candidate for Governor, Author. They All Wore the Same Hat.

Finally a lawyer and politician who openly campaigned on the fact that he was a thief.
The New York Times, April 5, 1914: “HOW I ROBBED TRAINS: BY A CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR; Al Jennings, Reformed Outlaw and Ex-Convict, Who Expects to be Chief Executive of Oklahoma, Tells the Story of His Exploits as Head [...]

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Krislov’s foundational The Negro in Federal Employment studies affirmative action at the beginning

Samuel Krislov’s much-cited study of civil rights in the U.S. civil service at a time of tumultuous change and reexamination is Digitally Remastered. Praised widely on its initial publication in 1967, the book remains an important part of the canon of literature on African American history, labor and civil service, the political science of federal [...]

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John Dewey’s 1910 How We Think Becomes a Digitally Remastered Book™ in Paperback

The “thought process” laid bare. One of America’s greatest philosophers and educators examines the nature and process of human reasoning, intellect, and emotion. John Dewey took a common sense approach to the subject, using examples and explanations that resonate today. His pragmatism has influenced much modern philosophy and the social [...]

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Meltsner’s Cruel and Unusual: Inside Story of the NAACP Inc. Fund Lawyers Who Fought to Abolish the Death Penalty

Michael Meltsner’s inside account, accessible to a wide audience and reading like a novel, of a small band of Fund lawyers and their 9-year struggle to end the death penalty. New edition features a 2011 Foreword by death-penalty author Evan Mandery of CUNY’s John Jay College of Criminal Justice, as well as a new Preface by the author. In paperback and 9 ebook formats.
The mission seemed as impossible then as going to the moon…

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James Fenimore Cooper spins tale of sailing, smuggling and romance in The Water-Witch

This unabridged and complete presentation of THE WATER-WITCH is unlike any reproduction of a vintage printing available (as is apparent in Previewing other offerings). It is unlike both new formattings which use small print to pack the story into half the pages (or give half the book), and typical vintage republications, whose [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review’s issue 3 of 2012 now out: internet censorship, spreading pollution, juries nullifying comparative fault

A leading law review offers a quality ebook edition. This third issue of 2012 features articles from internationally recognized legal scholars, and extensive research in Comments authored by University of Chicago Law School students. Contents for the issue include:
ARTICLES:
“Orwell’s Armchair,” by Derek E. Bambauer
“Jury Nullification in Modified Comparative Negligence Regimes,” by Eli K. [...]

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Neil Smelser’s Foundational Theory of Collective Behavior Adds Marx’s Extensive New Introduction

This golden anniversary edition is a modern take on a sociological and social psychology classic. Features a reflective new Preface by the author–and an extensive, analytical Foreword by MIT’s Gary Marx; he notes, “The book is elegant, original, carefully crafted and forcefully argued. In its totality, it is a fine example of an effort to define a field, identify major types and systematically connect central variables.”

Available now in hardcover, paperback, and 9 ebook formats.

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Timeless TVA and the Grass Roots by Philip Selznick now in modern edition, in print and eBooks

One of the great works of sociology, digging into government, business and organizations in an intense and telling way. The book is foundational as to modern organizational theory and practice. New Foreword by Jonathan Simon.

All formats have embedded page numbers from the previous editions, for full continuity of citation and ease of classroom adoptions. Digital formats include active Contents and linked subject Index.

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Historian Jerold Auerbach Writes Against the Grain, His Essays and Columns Collected

A new book by this recognized historian, writer and professor emeritus at Wellesley College, Against the Grain: A Historian’s Journey collects many accessible and heartfelt essays and book chapters from his greatest works over the years. Available in hardcover, paperback, and leading eBook formats.
“I was exceedingly fortunate to teach (for forty years) in an elite [...]

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Émile Durkheim’s classic Professional Ethics and Civic Morals is Digitally Remastered to eBook, Hardcover, and Paperback editions

Émile Durkheim’s foundational lecture series on civic roles and duties and the concept of the State, and on ethics in professions and trade groups, is at last presented in a quality digital edition (and new paperback). The ebook features usable formatting, linked notes and Contents, embedded pagination from standard print editions, [...]

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Barbara Wester pens imaginative novel The Illuminatrix for young adults and old adults

“When you find the truth, you may find that you cannot control its power.”
Would you tell the truth if it meant losing your job? Would you tell the truth if it meant challenging your government? Would you tell the truth if it meant a death sentence? What if you had to decide today? Sixteen-year-old Anne [...]

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Classic Bio of Ben Franklin by John Morse is a New Paperback, a Digitally Remastered Book

John Torrey Morse’s beloved biography of Benjamin Franklin, originally published in 1889 in the American Statesmen Series, is presented as a quality new paperback. The Digitally Remastered™ edition removes underlines and distracting stray marks, repairs missing parts of words, and is presented with enhanced, clearer text as compared to most such republications today. It even [...]

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Philip Schrag’s Counsel for the Deceived Goes Inside NYC’s First Consumer Protection Agency: Schemes, Humor and Insight

Protect the consumer. Stop the schemes and ripoffs. Make law work for the little guy. All easier said than done.
Memoirs and case studies of fraud schemes and consumer protection from an insider who helped to found New York City’s first consumer watchdog agency, Counsel for the Deceived is a funny, candid account of fraud and [...]

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Yale Law Journal’s 1st Issue of Academic Year 2012-2013 Examines Aggregation, Statutory Interpretation and Criminal Defense

One of the world’s leading law journals is available in quality ebook formats for ereader devices and apps. This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the first issue of Volume 122, academic year 2012-2013) features new articles and essays on legal theory, tort law, criminal defense representation, statutory interpretation, “branding” of celebrities and artists, and [...]

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Fede’s Roadblocks to Freedom Explores Slavery and Manumission Through Courtroom Practice, Evidence and Social Context

Called “the most comprehensive study of the law of manumission ever written” and “a must read for anyone interested in the legal history of slavery in the American South.” Fede views freedom suits and manumission as legal process, trial rules, and damages—beyond abstract principles stated in the decisions. He shows that procedure made it harder for slaves, or free blacks wrongly held, to win their freedom. Even winners mourned the legal realities actually recognized. In paperback, hardcover and eBooks.

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Jay Wexler spins stories of a Supreme Court Justice, Tu Fu, Clam Camp, a Black & White Zoo, and a Sitcom of Death Row

Available in paperback and at bookstores and ebook sites linked below.

A zoo with only black and white animals. A camp where children are forced to gather clams or face a trip to the ‘hot box.’ A Supreme Court Justice’s confirmation hearing presided over by the ‘77 KC Royals. BU law professor Jay [...]

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Émile Durkheim’s classic study of the social core of religious belief and practice: The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life

The unabridged work on the sociology of religion by a founder of the modern social science of sociology–now presented in a quality centennial edition. Émile Durkheim examines religion as a social phenomenon, across time and geographic boundaries. Some of the most basic forms of social organization are analyzed, along with their religious beliefs and practice, to find the core of faith and rite.

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Lawrence Friedman’s Provocative The Human Rights Culture, Views the Modern Arc of Rights as a Social and Historical Phenomenon

New from the acclaimed legal historian Lawrence Friedman, professor at Stanford. He does not mind going against the grain of most writers on human rights, to ask questions about its origins and import that the previous literature sidesteps. Why, as a social and historical matter, is all the rights discourse so pervasive and near-global today?

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University of Chicago Law Review’s Spring 2012 Issue 2: environmental science, class actions, suing courts, and bankrupt states

The second issue of 2012 features articles and essays from recognized legal scholars. They include Eric Biber, on variations in scientific disciplines, experts, and environmental law; Frederic Bloom & Christopher Serkin, on suing courts and takings of property; Myriam Gilles & Gary Friedman, on aggregating consumer suits after the AT&T Mobility decision on class actions; [...]

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Mitchell Smith, The Art of Caricaturing, now out in paperback and digitally remastered

One of the most downloaded classic books of all time gets a facelift and is available as a new and affordable paperback: Mitchell Smith’s The Art of Caricaturing. Smith’s comprehensive guide to creating caricature and cartoons is a classic book that today’s artists, both beginning and experienced, still read and consult to learn techniques, rules [...]

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Stanford Law Review for June 2012 examines shareholder proxy access, DOMA and choice of law for gay marriages, and massive copyright infringement in a digital age

The June 2012 issue of the Stanford Law Review (the last for this academic year) contains studies of law, economics, and social policy by recognized scholars on diverse topics of interest to the academic and professional community. Contents for the issue include:
• “Beyond DOMA: Choice of State Law in Federal Statutes”
William Baude
• “Does Shareholder Proxy [...]

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Yale Law Journal for June 2012 examines opt-out provisions, evaluating legal assistance, and the conflict between consumer protection and antitrust policy

This June 2012 issue of Yale Law Journal features articles by Ian Ayers on opt-out provisions and rule-altering, by James Greiner and Cassandra Pattanayak on randomized evaluation in legal assistance, and by Joshua Wright on a conflict between antitrust policy and consumer protection. Student work explores pretrial dismissal, fair mandatory arbitration, fair notice provisions, and corporate purposes.

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Roscoe Pound’s The Spirit of the Common Law: Now an ebook, exploring law and sociological jurisprudence

Pound’s classic 1921 study of what law means—and the concept and history of rules, judicial process, social engineering, and legal reasoning—from the Dean of Harvard Law School and given in lectures at Dartmouth College that year. It is finally available in a high-quality ebook edition.

Digital reproductions of such classic texts are typically scanned and forgotten, [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review offers its Maroonbook style guide in eBook formats

For more than twenty years, the editors of The University of Chicago Law Review have offered a simple, clear, and efficient system of legal citation and referencing for use by lawyers, students, and judges. The Maroonbook, as it is commonly called, provides an alternative to cumbersome and detailed methods of legal citation and produces consistent, [...]

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Harvard Law Review issue 8, June 2012: Developments on Presidential power, article on Spatial Diversity & redistricting, and review essay on Constitutional Originalism

The June 2012 issue features the Harvard Law Review’s annual, extensive, and famous DEVELOPMENTS IN THE LAW section; this year’s subject examines Presidential Authority. Issue 8 also includes an article by Nicholas Stephanopoulos, “Spatial Diversity,” which analyzes redistricting and other concepts of population dispersion, and a Book Review by Michael Dorf, [...]

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JM Review of IP Law special 2012 symposium issue explores IP and tech issues in China

Each spring, RIPL produces a symposium law review issue. The special symposium on APPLICATIONS OF LAW IP IN CHINA was held at John Marshall in April 2012, and brought together the leading voices on Sino-U.S. matters of IP law, innovation, and trade policy. In this important contribution, RIPL presents current articles on China and Asia–essentially a new book by experts in this emerging field.
In Kindle, Apple, and Nook formats.

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Physics for Entertainment: A classic Russian book that delivers on the fun-with-physics promise of its title

Soviet popular-science writer Yakov I. Perelman makes physics fun in his classic English-language book Physics for Entertainment: Book One, offering real-world applications, demonstrations, and fascinating phenomena that remain relevant—and educational—to modern readers. This book explains many of the most entertaining aspects of the physical world and its principles, including optical illusions, light tricks and mirages, [...]

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Stanford Law Review for May 2012 explores securities class actions, municipal “home rule,” and judicial pay

Contents for the May 2012 issue include:
• The City and the Private Right of Action, by Paul A. Diller
• Securities Class Actions Against Foreign Issuers, by Merritt B. Fox
• How Much Should Judges Be Paid? An Empirical Study on the Effect of Judicial Pay on the State Bench, by James M. Anderson & Eric Helland
• Note: How Congress Could Reduce Job Discrimination by Promoting Anonymous Hiring, by David Hausman

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The Nature and the Sources of the Law: John Chipman Gray’s Anatomy of Jurisprudence, Comparative Law, and the Concept of Rights

The Nature and Sources of the Law (Second Edition, 1921) is Gray’s legal and jurisprudential classic, finally available in a high-quality eBook edition and new paperback. It is the 11th contribution in the Legal Legends Series and, unlike most such classics typically reproduced by crude scanning, offers full assurances of careful proofreading, proper formatting, and [...]

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Oesterreich’s classic study Occultism and Modern Science is republished with digital corrections and professional presentation

OCCULTISM AND MODERN SCIENCE:  Traugott Konstantin Oesterreich (1880-1949) was a German professor of philosophy and an expert on the philosophy and psychology of religion. He taught as a professor at Tübingen University. He is considered to be one of the first modern German scientists to declare his belief in psychic phenomena. Although his views on parapsychology [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s new issue 7 (May 2012) features symposium on “the new private law”

Featured articles and essays in this issue are from recognized scholars in law and legal theory, including a Symposium on private law. The issue also includes the article “Regulation for the Sake of Appearance,” by Adam Samaha. The Symposium contents are:
THE NEW PRIVATE LAW
• “Introduction: Pragmatism and Private Law,”
by John C.P. Goldberg
• “The Obligatory Structure [...]

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Hot Topics in the Legal Profession • 2012 Analyzes Recent Events in Ethics and the Profession

Current important events in the U.S. legal profession and legal ethics, with useful research and analysis of the rules and the profession’s current status, are explored by Tulane law students from an advanced ethics seminar. Purchase of this book benefits Tulane’s Public Interest Law Foundation, a nonprofit student group that funds public interest placements and indigent client representations throughout the country.

In paperback and multiple eBook formats.

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Cynthia Fuchs Epstein’s foundational Women in Law adds Deborah Rhode’s new Foreword: available in paperback and eBooks

Simply one of the most important and influential works in the canon of the sociology of law, Epstein’s WOMEN IN LAW is now republished (including new paperback) and available worldwide for departments of sociology, law, and gender studies — but is accessible and fascinating to a general audience, unloaded with legal or sociological jargon. It won the SCRIBES Book Award and the ABA’s Merit Award.

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Yale Law Journal issue 7 (May 2012) examines voting, redistricting, and due process

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 7th issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012) features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors include Richard Re and Christopher Re, Nathan Chapman and Michael McConnell, Bruce Cain, Christopher Elmendorf and David Schleicher, and Joseph Fishkin.
The May issue’s complete Contents are:
“Voting and Vice: Criminal [...]

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Edna Lee Booker’s classic Flight from China: Inside account of Japanese occupation of China and World War II

Edna Lee Booker was an internationally recognized foreign correspondent who lived in China for two decades, along with her businessman husband John Potter. Raising a family in Shanghai, they were there when the Japanese invaded and occupied China. Looked upon with the suspicion of Americans in wartime, they realized the increasing [...]

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University of Chicago Law Review’s 2012 Issue 1: A Symposium on Understanding Education and Law, and Articles on Municipal Bankruptcy and Copyright

A leading law review now offers a quality eBook edition. This first issue of 2012 of the University of Chicago Law Review features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal and education scholars, including an extensive Symposium on understanding education and law in the United States. Topics include economic structures in education, teaching patriotism, charter [...]

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Stanford Law Review issue 4 (Apr. 2012) examines economic pricing, interpreting videos, classical Greek democracy, and copyright law

This current issue of the Stanford Law Review contains studies of law, economics, and social policy by recognized scholars on diverse topics of interest to the academic and professional community.
Contents for the April 2012 issue include:
• The Tragedy of the Carrots: Economics and Politics in the Choice of Price Instruments
by Brian Galle
• “They Saw a [...]

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Stanford Law Review March 2012 issue 3: Prosecuting the exonerated and double jeopardy, feminism and conflict of laws, and fragmentation nodes in finance

This new issue of the Stanford Law Review contains studies of law, economics, and social policy by recognized scholars on diverse topics of interest to the academic and professional community. Contents for the March 2012 issue include:
• “Prosecuting the Exonerated: Actual Innocence and the Double Jeopardy Clause” by Jordan M. Barry
• “From Multiculturalism to Technique: [...]

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Stanford Law Review’s Feb. 2012 Issue #2 Explores National Security, Thought Control, and Shareholder Liability

Contents for this February 2012 issue (Vol. 64, #2) include:
• “National Security Federalism in the Age of Terror”
By Matthew C. Waxman
• “Incriminating Thoughts”
By Nita A. Farahany
• “Elective Shareholder Liability”
By Peter Conti-Brown
• Note, “Harrington’s Wake: Unanswered Questions on AEDPA’s Application to Summary Dispositions”
By Matthew Seligman
• Comment, “Boumediene Applied Badly: The Extraterritorial Constitution After Al Maqaleh v. [...]

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Hardback, paperback & ebook: Rosen on the Roles and Dilemmas of Attorneys in Advising Corporations

Acclaimed study in law & society — already used and cited for its path-breaking research — passed around before in looseleaf, now available worldwide as a new book. Features new Foreword and Preface. In paperback, cloth and multiple digital formats. Called a “cult classic” and “wonderful” in recent blog posts.

“…Should be read by everyone interested in how law matters to organizations of all kinds.” –Prof. Jonathan Simon, UC Berkeley School of Law

“A pioneering work in the sociology of the legal profession and a foundational piece in the slowly emerging canon of empirical research on inside counsel…normatively challenges the legal profession’s ideology of moral ‘independence.’” — Prof. Sung Hui Kim, UCLA, from the new Foreword

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Yale Law Journal’s Issue 6 (April 2012) Studies WikiLeaks, Dissolving Cities, and the Interplay of Votes and Rights

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 6th issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012, Apr. 2012) features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors include Daryl Levinson (on votes and rights), Michelle Wilde Anderson (on dissolving cities), and Patricia Bella (on WikiLeaks and national security). The issue also features student contributions [...]

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Michael O’Neal’s new Slavery, Smallholding and Tourism Examines the British Virgin Islands with Anthropology and History

Explores the political economy of development in the BVI — from plantations, through a smallholding economy, to the rise of tourism. The demise of plantations ushered in a century of imperial disinterest, then a new “monocrop” — tourism — became ascendant. Using an historical and anthropological approach, O’Neal shows how later reliance on tourism and other dependent industries affects many BVIslanders — called the “Belongers” — in ways that echo their historical and economic heritage.
NEW IN PAPERBACK, HARDCOVER, and multiple eBOOK FORMATS.

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Anthology of Key West’s Greatest Writers Includes Hemingway, Dos Passos, Tennessee Williams, Hunter Thompson, and Elizabeth Bishop

The Key West Reader features 25 of the most insightful and entertaining works that resonate from Key West: an edited collection of the finest literary and poetic works about Key West or from writers who lived in, or were touched by their time in, the Florida island community. It is said that Key West hosts [...]

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Martin Shapiro Links Freedom of Speech with the Legitimate Political Role of the Supreme Court

A classic study of the free speech right and especially the function of the Supreme Court in review—in effect answering, before his time, Chief Justice Roberts’ claim that judges are neutral umpires. Such judicial modesty ignores the Court’s political role in governing and protecting under-represented citizens.

In paperback edition, plus Kindle, Nook, Apple, and other ebook formats.

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Harvard Law Review’s March 2012 Issue Analyzes Overlap of Administrative Agencies, Prison Reform, and Recent Cases and Legislation

Featured articles in this March 2012 issue are from such recognized scholars as Jody Freeman and Jim Rossi, on the coordination of administrative agencies when they share regulatory space, and James Whitman, reviewing Bernard Harcourt’s new book on the illusion of free markets as to prisons. Student contributions explore the law relating to antitrust and [...]

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Harvard Law Review April 2012 Issue Studies “Traditional” Sex Discrimination, the Presidency, and Criminal Process

Featured articles and essays in the April 2012 issue are from such recognized scholars as Cary Franklin (in an article on inventing the “traditional concept” of sex discrimination), Richard Pildes (on law and the President, in an essay reviewing a book by Eric Posner and Adrian Vermeule), and Robert Weisberg (on [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s Feb. 2012 Issue Features Articles by Amanda Tyler and Kenneth Mack, Plus Recent Cases

Featured articles are from such recognized scholars as Amanda Tyler, on the core meaning of the Suspension Clause, and Kenneth Mack, reviewing Brown-Nagin’s book on the grass roots origins of the civil rights movement. Also, several judges and professors write a tribute honoring Frank Michelman. In Kindle, Apple and Nook.

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Yale Law Journal’s March 2012 Issue Features Articles on Tax Discrimination and the 26th Amendment

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (the 5th issue of Volume 121, academic year 2011-2012) features articles and essays by several notable scholars. Principal contributors include Ruth Mason and Michael Knoll (an article on tax discrimination), and Michael Graetz and Alvin Warren, Jr. (a featured essay also analyzing tax discrimination, and in response). Student [...]

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