Jay Jacobs’ new The Widow Wave offers exciting account of wrongful death trial from shipwreck

Will anyone ever know what happened to the Aloha, a sport fishing boat that vanished with all onboard in the Pacific off San Francisco’s coast? ‘Knowing’ may be a complex, inexact business. There’s real truth and then there’s courtroom truth; a jury’s verdict may or may not approach what actually happened. Nor can someone reading about [...]

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Cicero’s On Old Age is adapted and illustrated for today’s reader, with commentary and humor

Richard Gerberding, a retired Professor of History and Director of Classical Studies at the University of Alabama – Huntsville, adapts the classic On Old Age to a new generation of readers. Illustrator Lance Rossi of Salem, Oregon, contributes over sixty clever drawings and sketches. There’s no edition paying homage to Cicero anywhere like this.
Cicero’s classic [...]

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Slow Fire: A U.S. Philosopher’s Fascinating Account of Divided Berlin in the ’80s

Susan Neiman went to learn more about morality and reason, which she did, but she also came to terms with being Jewish in a city that did not always welcome her, as if her presence was a guilty reminder. (Or they did not know she was Jewish and said some amazing stuff.) This memoir–through the [...]

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Solomon Northup’s Twelve Years a Slave is republished in quality hardcover, paperback & eBooks

The classic and compelling narrative of the kidnapping, slavery, and freedom of a free man of color wrested to rural Louisiana. Lured to the nation’s capital by the prospect of work, Solomon Northup, a free man born in New York, is kidnapped and sold into slavery. He spends the next twelve years in brutal bondage. Paperback, hardback and eBooks, featuring readable font & additional rare imagery of the author’s life.

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Lee Scheingold’s One Silken Thread ties poetry, loss, and introspection

Lee Scheingold’s rich, painful personal journey—following the death of her husband, famed political scientist Stuart Scheingold—is described from the points of view which have informed her life: psychoanalysis, clinical social work, Buddhist meditation, and family medicine. Poetry is the connecting thread, beginning with the Russian poems she studied long ago in college, and then to [...]

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Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Travel and History Essays While Living in England as U.S. Consul

It helped to have a college friend who was the President of the United States.
This classic collection of essays and travel observations is newly presented by Quid Pro Books as a Digitally Remastered Book.™ Rather than reducing its font size and cramping the text into a smaller book, and consistent with its vintage presentation in [...]

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Lawyer, Train Robber, Convict, Candidate for Governor, Author. They All Wore the Same Hat.

Finally a lawyer and politician who openly campaigned on the fact that he was a thief.
The New York Times, April 5, 1914: “HOW I ROBBED TRAINS: BY A CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR; Al Jennings, Reformed Outlaw and Ex-Convict, Who Expects to be Chief Executive of Oklahoma, Tells the Story of His Exploits as Head [...]

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Historian Jerold Auerbach Writes Against the Grain, His Essays and Columns Collected

A new book by this recognized historian, writer and professor emeritus at Wellesley College, Against the Grain: A Historian’s Journey collects many accessible and heartfelt essays and book chapters from his greatest works over the years. Available in hardcover, paperback, and leading eBook formats.
“I was exceedingly fortunate to teach (for forty years) in an elite [...]

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Edna Lee Booker’s classic Flight from China: Inside account of Japanese occupation of China and World War II

Edna Lee Booker was an internationally recognized foreign correspondent who lived in China for two decades, along with her businessman husband John Potter. Raising a family in Shanghai, they were there when the Japanese invaded and occupied China. Looked upon with the suspicion of Americans in wartime, they realized the increasing [...]

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Eleanor Lothrop’s Throw Me a Bone Tells of Adventures in Archaeology in South America

“If you marry a man it is presumably because you like the man and not, necessarily, his profession. Marrying a mortician or a dentist, for instance, does not presuppose a passionate interest in and a knowledge of embalming or filling teeth. Yet an archaeologist’s bride is expected to emerge from the [...]

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Scovel’s 1962 The Chinese Ginger Jars spans two decades of tumult and transition in China

The true, captivating, and intensely personal account of an extraordinary American woman and nurse who lived, with her medical missionary husband and son, through more than two decades of transition in China. Eventually facing occupation by the Japanese, then forced to leave the newly Communist country, she provided an intimate portrait [...]

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I Saw Them Die: historical and occasionally bizarre account from a WWI nurse

Shirley Millard’s harrowing and fascinating account of her MASH-like experience in WWI France gives insights she intends and many more that she does not. Reading it is an experience on several levels. One of the most fascinating personal accounts of the Great War from just behind the lines, first published in 1936, and updated by Prof. Elizabeth Townsend Gard.

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Jones’ Introspective, Candid Memoir About Living with Mental Illness as a Law Professor, A Hidden Madness: Available in eBooks

James Jones’ acclaimed A Hidden Madness tells the story of an accomplished individual who has reached the pinnacle of his profession despite suffering for over thirty years from the severe mental illness bipolar disorder. He has done so mostly in silence because of fear of stigma. Extreme childhood bullying helped cause his condition, which has [...]

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Grandfather J. B.: Letters to My Grandson offers strong characters and longings for education and philosophy

From the family of Mary Grossman and Joel Grossman (she the coeditor of Law & Change in Modern America, he a chaired professor of political science at Johns Hopkins), comes the witty, acerbic, and sweet correspondence by grandfather Joseph Bercovici, a self-taught Romanian immigrant who produced a “clan” of novelists and academics. This is his [...]

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Jerold Auerbach’s journeys, hearing Jacob’s Voices, make him confront being American and Jewish

An acclaimed American professor of U.S. history finds his roots in a personal journey through Israel (and through assimilated America, academia, and family), into deep tensions about culture, identity and religion. Available in paperback, Kindle, Sony, and Nook formats, plus online and PDF.

AVAILABLE in multiple digital formats and a new paperback too.

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