Thorsten Sellin’s Slavery and the Penal System is Digitally Remastered:™ Shows history of using slave labor as criminal sentence, invention of the treadmill

The classic and groundbreaking study of penal slavery throughout the ages is finally available again. Previously a rare book — despite the fact that it is widely quoted and cited by scholars in the field of sociology, penology, and criminology — this book can now be accessed easily worldwide and be assigned again to classes.
Now in its [...]

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Harvard Law Review, May ‘16: Searches and the 4th Amendment; Law as Force; and Agency Review of Due Process

The May 2016 issue, Number 7, features these contents:
• Article, “The Positive Law Model of the Fourth Amendment,” by William Baude and James Y. Stern
• Essay, “Deference and Due Process,” by Adrian Vermeule
• Book Review, “How to Explain Things with Force,” by Mark Greenberg
• Note, “Free Speech Doctrine After Reed v. Town of Gilbert”
Furthermore, student [...]

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Messinger’s much-cited Strategies of Control is a Digitally Remastered™ Classic of Law & Society

This groundbreaking study of transitions and control in the California prison system has been extensively read, cited, and quoted in unpublished form—and is finally available worldwide. Already a compelling part of the canon of studies in penology, criminology, sociology, and organizational theory, this new edition of STRATEGIES OF CONTROL adds a 2016 foreword by Howard S. [...]

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Yale Law Journal, April ‘16: Administrative Forbearance, and The New Public

This issue of the Yale Law Journal (the sixth issue of academic year 2015-2016) features articles and essays by notable scholars, as well as extensive student research. The issue’s contents include:
• Article, “Administrative Forbearance,” by Daniel T. Deacon
• Essay, “The New Public,” by Sarah A. Seo
The student contributions are:
• Note, “How To Trim a Christmas Tree: Beyond Severability [...]

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Aviva Orenstein pens novel Fat Chance about a zaftig lawyer lucky at work but not so much at home and play

Confident at work but clueless at love, Claire is 40 and overweight—not a recipe she imagines can solve the romance gap. Dealing with her father’s death and an angry teen doesn’t make it easier. Finding no help from her ex, who is distracted by remarriage to a much younger woman, Claire copes by relying on [...]

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Hirsch relives the academic life, warts and all, in his memoir Office Hours

Even a cursory glance at today’s headlines reveals that higher education is in crisis. Tuition outpaces inflation, states slash budgets, graduation rates decline, and technology threatens to reshape everything. Universities continue to crank out new PhDs, but many will become poorly paid members of a secondary, adjunct labor force teaching most of today’s college courses. [...]

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Yale Law Journal, March ‘16: Municipal bankruptcy, professional speech, insider trading, and reproductive rights

This issue of the Yale Law Journal (the fifth issue of academic year 2015-2016) features articles and essays by notable scholars, as well as extensive student research. Contents include:
• “Governance Reform and the Judicial Role in Municipal Bankruptcy,” by Clayton P. Gillette & David A. Skeel, Jr.
• “Professional Speech,” by Claudia E. Haupt
• “Casey and [...]

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Harvard Law Review, Apr. ‘16, is special Developments in the Law issue, on Indian Law

The April 2016 issue is the annual Developments in the Law special issue. The topic of this extensive study is “Indian Law,” including specific focus on tribal executive branches, tribal authority to follow fresh pursuit onto non-tribal (state) land, reconsidering ICRA and rights, securing Native American voting rights, and indigenous people and extractive industries. In [...]

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Llewellyn’s Classic Guide to Law Study and 1L Advice, The Bramble Bush: features Introduction and notes by Stewart Macaulay

Written over 80 years ago, but highly relevant still, THE BRAMBLE BUSH is frequently and strongly recommended for students considering law school, just before starting, or early in the first semester. It began as introductory lectures by legal legend Karl Llewellyn to 1Ls at Columbia. It still speaks to law, legal reasoning, class prep, and exam skills–a classic for each new generation.
In new paperback, hardcover, Kindle, Apple & Nook. Introduced and annotated.

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Harvard Law Review, Mar. ‘16, explores adoptions and parenthood after Obergefell, shareholder horizontal equity, and police abuse of poor and minority communities

The Harvard Law Review, March 2016, features these contents:
• Article, “Marriage Equality and the New Parenthood,” by Douglas NeJaime
• Essay, “Horizontal Shareholding,” by Einer Elhauge
• Book Review, “Keeping Track: Surveillance, Control, and the Expansion of the Carceral State,” by Kathryne M. Young and Joan Petersilia
• Note, “Constitutional Courts and International Law: Revisiting the Transatlantic Divide”
• [...]

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Yale Law Journal, Feb. 2016: History of patent cases’ explosion, 4th Amendment issues of ‘effects,’ and tributes to Robert A. Burt

The February issue of the Yale Law Journal features articles and essays by notable scholars, as well as extensive student research. The issue is dedicated to the memory of Professor Robert A. Burt, with essays in his honor by Robert Post, Owen Fiss, Monroe Price, Martha Minow, Martin Boehmer, Anthony Kronman, Frank Iacobucci, and Andrew [...]

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New England Law Review, Vol. 50, No. 1, on military prosecutors and commanders, charging authority, and sexual assault cases

The New England Law Review offers its issues in convenient digital formats for e-reader devices, apps, pads, and phones. This first issue of Volume 50 (Fall 2015) features an extensive and important Symposium entitled “Discipline, Justice, and Command in the U.S. Military,” presented by leading scholars on the subject. Contents include:
“Introduction [...]

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Harvard Law Review, Feb. 2016: Constitutional bad faith, immunization and Ebola-quarantine, and does speech matter?

The February 2016 issue, Number 4, features these contents:
* Article, “Constitutional Bad Faith,” by David E. Pozen
* Book Review, “No Immunity: Race, Class, and Civil Liberties in Times of Health Crisis,” by Michele Goodwin & Erwin Chemerinsky
* Book Review, “How Much Does Speech Matter?,” by Leslie Kendrick
* Note, “State Bans on Debtors’ [...]

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Yale Law Journal, Jan. 2016: Dual-class corporate governance, international law by Hobbes, Burger Court federalism, & wolf packs

This January 2016 issue of the Yale Law Journal features articles and essays by notable scholars, as well as extensive student research. Contents include:
• Article, “Corporate Control and Idiosyncratic Vision,” by Zohar Goshen & Assaf Hamdani
• Essay, “The Domestic Analogy Revisited: Hobbes on International Order,” by David Singh Grewal
• Note, “Repairing the Irreparable: Revisiting the [...]

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Barry Schaller pens new 2016 political-legal-military novel The Ramadi Affair

Connecticut judge David Lawson is a decorated veteran of Iraq, now thrust onto the national stage when the press learns he’s up for an unexpected vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Despite his successful career and his loyal political team of friends who understand Supreme Court politics, David is haunted by tragedies—from his early life and [...]

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Good Courts by Berman and Feinblatt is digitally remastered,™ adding new Foreword

Presented in a new digital edition, and adding a Foreword by Jonathan Lippman, Chief Judge of the state of New York, Good Courts is now available as an eBook to criminal justice workers, jurists, lawyers, political scientists, court officials, and others interested in the future of alternative justice and process in the United States.
Public confidence [...]

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Harvard Law Review’s Jan. 2016 issue analyzes Presidential Intelligence and the rise of the administrative state

The January 2016 issue, Number 3, features these contents:
• Article, “Presidential Intelligence,” by Samuel J. Rascoff
• Book Review, “The Struggle for Administrative Legitimacy,” by Jeremy K. Kessler (reviewing Daniel Ernst’s book on the origins of the administrative state)
• Note, “Existence-Value Standing”
• Note, “Rethinking Closely Regulated Industries”
In addition, student commentary analyzes [...]

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Linda Veazey argues for a gendered view of cultural rights instead of the usual dichotomy

A Woman’s Right to Culture is a new and insightful analysis of the usual meme that cultural rights in international law are at odds with the rights of women in affected societies. Rather than seeing these concepts as mutually exclusive, Linda Veazey frames cultural rights — through detailed case studies and analysis of law — [...]

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Harvard Law Review, Dec. 2015: On Intra-Agency Conflicts, Selling Body Parts and Milk, Immigrant Detention, and Conflict of Laws

The December 2015 issue, Number 2, features these contents:
• Article, “Intra-Agency Coordination,” by Jennifer Nou
• Book Review, “Body Banking from the Bench to the Bedside,” by Natalie Ram
• Note, “‘A Prison Is a Prison Is a Prison’: Mandatory Immigration Detention and the Sixth Amendment Right to Counsel”
• Note, “Bundled Systems and Better Law: Against the [...]

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New England Law Review, Vol. 49, No. 4, on privacy and big data: a new symposium on technology and privacy

The New England Law Review offers its issues in convenient digital formats for e-reader devices, apps, pads, and phones. This 4th issue of Volume 49 (Sum. 2015) features an extensive and important Symposium entitled “What Stays in Vegas,” presented by leading scholars on the subject of privacy and big data. Contents include:
* “Legal Questions Raised [...]

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Boyum & Mather’s classic Empirical Theories About Courts is Digitally Remastered: A foundational work in the field of trial courts

The classic and groundbreaking study of trial courts and other dispute processes — and foundational ways to think about researching them — is now available in a modern digital edition. It is edited by Professors Keith O. Boyum and Lynn Mather, and contains chapters from the leading theorists about courts and their research.
Much cited and [...]

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Harvard Law Review, #1 for 2015-2016: The Supreme Court, 2014 Term, Has Case Summaries; Essays by Strauss, Gluck, Goldsmith and Yoshino

The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court’s previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2014 Term, articles include:
* Foreword: “Does the Constitution Mean What It Says?,” by David A. Strauss
* Comment: “Imperfect Statutes, Imperfect Courts: [...]

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Yale Law Journal, Nov. 2015: data privacy & extraterritoriality; political entrenchment using law; Posner on marriage equality; & financing class actions

The contents of November 2015 (Vol. 125, No. 2) are:
Articles: “The Un-Territoriality of Data,” by Jennifer Daskal; and
“Political Entrenchment and Public Law,” by Daryl Levinson & Benjamin I. Sachs
Review Essay: “18 Years On: A Re-Review,” by Richard A. Posner (reviewing William Eskridge’s book on marriage equality)
Note: “Financing the Class: Strengthening the Class Action Through Third-Party [...]

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Lisa McElroy’s new novel Called On “may be this generation’s One L

“Lisa McElroy perfectly captures the pressures, challenges, and triumphs of both teaching and studying the law. Filled with big, memorable personalities, Called On is an utterly charming depiction of the 1L experience.” — Alafair Burke, New York Times bestselling author of The Ex
“McElroy nails law school—from first-day jitters to gunners and back-benchers—in a funny, perceptive, [...]

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Paul Pruitt’s new collection of young lawyers’ essays on Alabama legal history

NEW FIELD, NEW CORN is an anthology of research papers that explore a range of topics from the rich legal history of the state of Alabama and its influential legal and judicial figures. Contemporary photography and mapwork are featured as well.
“Alabama legal history can be surprising. Usually, this history is identified [...]

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Yale Law Journal, No. 1 of 2015-16: Immigration policy, discrimination and immutability, nudges, and IRL

The contents of the October 2015 issue (Volume 125, Number 1) are:
Article: Against Immutability, by Jessica A. Clarke
Article: The President and Immigration Law Redux, by Adam B. Cox & Cristina M. Rodriguez
Essay: Which Way To Nudge? Uncovering Preferences in the Behavioral Age, by Jacob Goldin
Note: Saving 60(b)(5): The Future of Institutional Reform Litigation, by Mark [...]

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Lawrence Friedman’s novel Dead in the Park has Frank May tracking down his link to a corpse

Frank May is a private practice lawyer in San Mateo, California, and he doesn’t want to get involved with an unidentified dead body in the park. So why is he involved with an unidentified dead body in the park? The man was found in a neighboring California town with no identification; all the police found [...]

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Jonathan Liljeblad explores endangered species and international law, and how CITES is enforced locally

Debates over U.S. government policy frequently follow a philosophy of devolution in authority from federal government to local government. This concept opens the possibility of greater local involvement in national policy implementation—and provides international treaties an opportunity to advance global policy by incorporating the efforts of local actors into their implementation framework. Much of international [...]

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A Personal Journal, Now Memoir, of Fighting Breast Cancer and of Faith

Tracy McCain is in for the battle of her life. A diagnosis of breast cancer; a treatment of surgery and chemo. Confronting challenge after challenge — to her health and to her faith — Tracy generously shared her journey with relatives and friends by posting regular entries to a website. Candid, revealing, and introspective, and [...]

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Buddy Ward’s novel Brave West Wind takes Steamer Causey from the Bahamas to Danger

Storms destroy things and leave their marks forever. Captain Steamer Causey–a charter boat captain on one of the finest boats in all the Bahamas–thought he had his life all arranged and had put his past far behind him. He did not look for, and did not see, the signs of the storms building all about [...]

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Robert Sauté recounts history and institutions of U.S. public interest law in his book For the Poor and Disenfranchised

Robert Sauté’s study explores over a century of public interest representations, pro bono legal work, and litigation groups such as the ACLU and NAACP’s Inc. Fund from a social science perspective of history and institutional analysis.
For the Poor and Disenfranchised is a sociological account of the public interest bar in the United States. It traces [...]

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Raskin’s acclaimed study of classic Jewish jokes is Digitally Remastered™ in a new, expanded Second Edition

The first book on Jewish humor in which individual jokes are singled out for comprehensive study, Life is Like a Glass of Tea devotes a chapter to each of eight major jokes, tracing its history and variants—and looking closely at the ways in which the comic behavior enacted in the punchline can be [...]

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Lawrence Friedman’s novel Death of a Schemer pits Frank May against a house full of suspects

Frank May, the lawyer who’s a reluctant detective, takes on the mystery of a house full of characters and and secrets. Frank’s law office is in San Mateo, California, his practice often dealing with wills and estates. Dead clients are an essential part of an estates practice, but these are, for almost everybody, quite natural [...]

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Agostino Inguscio explores 12th-century Genoa in new book on family and civil conflicts

A compelling new study of conflicts in Genoa during the 12th century. This book takes on the established orthodoxy about the extent, nature and effects of family conflicts and other civil disputes in medieval Genoa. As Emanuele Ferragina writes in the Foreword, Inguscio “brings history and its complexity back in, and he does so in [...]

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New book on foreign investments in Asian power projects: handling political risk

The Legal Protection of Foreign Investments Against Political Risk examines how political risks associated with foreign direct investment in the energy sector are managed or mitigated, and suggests new ways to deal with the possibility of such risk. It applies its analysis–using case studies and international law, and examining actual contracts–to the specific context of [...]

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New England Law Review #3 (2015): Symposium on Ph.D. and J.S.D. study in law for U.S. and international students

The New England Law Review offers its issues in convenient digital formats for e-reader devices, apps, pads, smartphones, and computers.
This third issue of Volume 49 (Spr. 2015) features an extensive and important Symposium on “Educational Ambivalence: The Story of the Academic Doctorate in Law,” presented by leading scholars on the subject. Contents include:
“Educational Ambivalence: The [...]

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Leading Voices on Justice Under Law Discuss Civil Liberties, National Security, Gitmo, Immigration and Health Care

Law and the Quest for Justice is a 2013 book featuring evocative essays on hotbed issues of rights, liberty, security and law. An insightful collection of essays from leading voices on the challenges and promise of justice and law, this book is accessible and interesting to a wide audience. It features internationally renowned [...]

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Classic Social Science, Digitally Remastered: The Sociology of the Professions, edited by Dingwall & Lewis

Robert Dingwall and Philip Lewis’s renowned compilation of diverse studies—written by internationally recognized theorists and empirical researchers into the sociology of the professions—was groundbreaking when first published in 1983 and has influenced scholars, practitioners, and professionals since. Not limited to one occupation or field, as are most such works, this collection examines across traditional fields [...]

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Slow Fire: A U.S. Philosopher’s Fascinating Account of Divided Berlin in the ’80s

Susan Neiman went to learn more about morality and reason, which she did, but she also came to terms with being Jewish in a city that did not always welcome her, as if her presence was a guilty reminder. (Or they did not know she was Jewish and said some amazing stuff.) This memoir–through the [...]

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Walter Murphy’s bestselling novel The Vicar of Christ is Digitally Remastered™ and available again: explores the Supreme Court and Vatican politics

The New York Times Bestseller is now available in modern digital formats, featuring a new Foreword by Justice Samuel Alito, as well as a new paperback and hardcover. This book has universally been considered an unusual, fascinating, and well-written observation of the life of a man who was first a war hero and Medal of [...]

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Yale Law Journal, June 2015, on mandatory arbitration, constitutional proportionality review, and creditors’ partitioning

The contents of the 8th and final issue of academic year 2014-2015 (June 2015) are:
Article, “The New Corporate Web: Tailored Entity Partitions and Creditors’ Selective Enforcement,” Anthony J. Casey
Note, “A Reassessment of Common Law Protections for ‘Idiots,’” Michael Clemente
Feature: Arbitration, Transparency, and Privatization:
“Diffusing Disputes: The Public in the Private of Arbitration, the Private in Courts, [...]

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Eliezer Segal explores Jewish history and legends in his witty new collection of essays Chronicles and Commentaries

The controversial history of sermons, the physics and philosophy of rainbows, lions in the synagogue, hares in the Greek Bible, the gold standard, God in human disguise—these are but a few of the many topics that are introduced in this lively miscellany of glimpses into exotic frontiers of Jewish literature, history, and tradition. In the [...]

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New England Law Review, Volume 49, Nos. 1-2 (2014-2015): On confrontation clause, constitutional interpretation, outpatient commitment, and patent law

The New England Law Review now offers its issues in convenient digital formats for e-reader devices, apps, pads, smartphones, and computers. This second issue of Volume 49 (2015) contains articles by leading figures of the legal community. Contents include:
Articles:
“A Reliable and Clear-Cut Determination: Is a Separate Hearing Required to Decide When Confrontation Forfeiture by Wrongdoing [...]

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Harvard Law Review, June 2015: Origins of low-value speech, legal change in the modern Supreme Court, and causation in toxic torts

The Harvard Law Review, June 2015, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include:
• Article, “Active Avoidance: The Modern Supreme Court and Legal Change,” by Neal Kumar Katyal and Thomas P. Schmidt
• Article, “The Invention of Low-Value Speech,” by Genevieve Lakier
• Book Review, “Crown and Constitution,” by Tara Helfman
• Note, “Causation in Environmental Law: Lessons [...]

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Eliezer Segal’s new collection of fun, informative essays on the Jewish calendar: A Time for Every Purpose

A Time for Every Purpose continues the series of collections of Eliezer Segal’s beloved and witty articles about the Jewish sacred calendar — articles that originally appeared in his From the Sources column in the Calgary Jewish Free Press between 2011 and 2015. As always, the author strives to maintain [...]

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Yale Law Journal, May 2015 Issue 7: on punishing offenses under treaties, administrative severability clauses, judges citing scholarship, and Hobby Lobby

The contents of the May 2015 issue (Volume 124, Number 7) are:
Articles
• Defining and Punishing Offenses Under Treaties, Sarah H. Cleveland & William S. Dodge
• Administrative Severability Clauses, Charles W. Tyler & E. Donald Elliott
Notes
• Class Ascertainability, Geoffrey C. Shaw
• The Right To Be Rescued: Disability Justice in an Age of Disaster, Adrien A. Weibgen
• [...]

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Harvard Law Review, May ‘15, on foreign relations law, changing family law, and bankrupt student loans

The Harvard Law Review, May 2015, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include:
• Article, “The Normalization of Foreign Relations Law,” by Ganesh Sitaraman and Ingrid Wuerth
• Book Review, “The Family, in Context,” by Maxine Eichner
• Note, “Forgive and Forget: Bankruptcy Reform in the Context of For-Profit Colleges”

In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases and policy positions, including such subjects as: retroactive prosecution of conspiracy to commit war crimes at Guantanamo; holding a legislature in contempt for unconstitutional funding of education; bullying and criminal harassment law; first amendment implications of high school suppression of violent speech; using statistics to prove False Claims Act [...]

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Frank Zimring’s witty essays observing the modern condition and aging form the new book Memos from Midlife

“… It’s the most entertaining book I’ve read this year.” —Steve Chapman, Columnist and Editorial Writer, The Chicago Tribune
There are no pretentious pronouncements about public policy or dry conclusions from social science in these pages … because it is a report from what Frank Zimring calls “my second career, and everybody else’s second career, the [...]

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Wester’s book Land Divided By Law explores environmental history of Yakama Indians in Pacific Northwest

Wester’s environmental history of Yakama and Euro-American cultural interactions during the 19th and early 20th century explores the role of law in both curtailing and promoting rights to subsistence resources within a market economy. Her study, using original source files, case histories, and contemporary writings, particularly describes how the struggle [...]

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New devotional follows the seasons from a Christian point of view

Journey through a series of short stories based on real life experiences: soul searching, humorous, and all with the primary goal of promoting Christ. This devotional will take you through all four seasons of the year. You will be encouraged and filled with His hope as you read and grow in your faith.
“What an amazing [...]

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