New England Law Review’s recent issues of Volume 50 discuss press freedom after Hulk Hogan/Gawker and the feminist legacy of Mary Joe Frug

The New England Law Review offers its issues in convenient digital formats for e-reader devices, apps, pads, and smartphones. The second issue of Volume 50 (Wint. 2016) features a Book Symposium analyzing Prof. Amy Gajda’s new study The First Amendment Bubble: How Privacy and Paparazzi Threaten a Free Press. (The next issue, No. 3, is noted below). Contributions include:

• “The Present of Newsworthiness,” by Amy Gajda

• “Protecting the Public from Itself: Paternalism and Irony in Defining Newsworthiness,” by Clay Calvert

• “The Problem with Free Press Absolutism,” by Sonja R. West

In addition, Number 2 includes these extensive student contributions:

• “Marijuana Side Effects,” by Christine L. Vana (on the environmental impacts of the uneasy legal status of marijuana cultivation)

• “The (Unfinished) Growth of the Juvenile Justice System,” by Conor Walsh

No. 2: Available in leading digital formats:

Kindle, at Amazon.

Nook, at Barnes & Noble.

Apple iBooks and iTunes: see it on iPad and iPhone; previewed online.

At Google Play and Google Books.

Also in universal ePUB format at Smashwords; and look for it at Kobobooks, Axis360, Scribd, and related sites.

Cataloging: Volume 50, Number 2 (Wint. 2016):

ISBN 9781610277891 (ePUB)
ASIN B01KU2NWUW (Kindle)
List price: US $0.99 (ebook)
Page count: 133 pp.
Published: Aug. 21, 2016

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The New England Law Review’s third issue of Volume 50 (Spr. 2016) features a thoughtful Symposium on the legacy, scholarship, and impact of the late Mary Joe Frug.

Contributors to the Symposium are Dean Martha Minow of Harvard Law School, Professors Gerald Frug and Joseph William Singer of Harvard Law, Prof. Laura Underkuffler of Cornell Law, and Dean Laura Rosenbury of the University of Florida School of Law. Subjects include feminist legal theory and scholarship, anti-paternalism, and “subversive property.”

In addition, Number 3 includes these substantial student contributions: Note, “Who Watches the Watchers?” by Justin Amos (on oversight of prosecutors); and “Why is Your Grass Greener than Mine? The Need for Legal Reform to Combat Gender Discrimination in Professional Sports,” by Tanya Dennis.

Quality digital formatting includes linked notes, active table of contents, active URLs in notes, and proper Bluebook citations. Earlier issues supplied in this digital format are also available, including several from Volumes 48 and 49 as well as Volume 50. The NELR is a quarterly journal on law and policy published by students of the New England Law School | Boston. Contributing authors of articles and essays include leading legal figures and scholars, as well as student contributions in the form of Notes and Comments.

No. 3: Available in leading digital formats:

Kindle, at Amazon.

Nook, at Barnes & Noble.

Apple iBooks and iTunes: see it on iPad and iPhone; previewed online.

At Google Play and Google Books.

Also in ePUB format at Smashwords; and look for it at Kobobooks, Axis360, Scribd, and related ebook sites.

Cataloging: Volume 50, Number 3 (Spr. 2016):

ISBN 9781610277808 (ePUB)
ASIN B01KY5HC9W (Kindle)
List price: US $0.99 (ebook)
Page count: 120 pp.
Published: Aug. 24, 2016